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Dean Miles

President - Executive Leadership Coach at Bridgepoint Coaching & Strategy Group

LAKE JACKSON, United States

Dean is the founder and president of Bridgepoint Coaching & Strategy Group, a global executive coaching firm. He has spent his career unlocking great leaders and aligning exceptional teams in the process of producing exceptional results. Marshall Goldsmith recently invited Dean to join 100 Coaches (#MG100), an invitation-only community of the world’s leading executive coaches. Dean also serves as a member of Forbes' prestigious Council for Executive Coaches and is a member of The Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) - a top-ranked global provider of leadership development programs. Furthermore, he has been a Fellow at The Institute of Coaching at Harvard Medical School for the last seven years. Thinkers360 recognizes Dean as a Top 10 Global Thought Leader in Business Continuity, Top 25 Global Thought Leader in Startups & Mental Health, and Top 50 Global Thought Leader in Entrepreneurship.

Dean is a master at understanding the needs of organizations and individuals. He has been coaching and facilitating programs for groups and individuals around the country on many organizational, interpersonal and personal topics since 1996. With his extensive experience in manufacturing, mining, aerospace, financial services, health care, oil and gas, rail services, and non-profits; Dean knows how to get the best out of people. Dean's knowledge of his client’s unique needs is invaluable in identifying key areas of improvement that lead to desired outcomes.

He has been described as an intuitive risk-taker who will partner with you to uncover your strengths and opportunities.

Dean's work with Fortune 500 CEOs has been featured in publications such as Forbes Magazine, Fast Company, CareerPro, Vistage & Inc. Magazine.

Available For: Consulting, Influencing, Speaking
Travels From: Houston, Texas
Speaking Topics: Understanding Team Dynamics, How to Predict Exceptional Results, It's Time to be Evocative

Speaking Fee $5,000 (In-Person)

Dean Miles Points
Academic 20
Author 132
Influencer 94
Speaker 23
Entrepreneur 20
Total 289

Points based upon Thinkers360 patent-pending algorithm.

Thought Leader Profile

Portfolio Mix

Featured Videos

Managing & Measuring Team Efforts
May 22, 2022
Grace Under Pressure
May 22, 2022
Crisis-Proofing Your Talent Process
May 22, 2022

Featured Topics

HOW TO BUILD THE PERFECT TEAM

Much of the work done at Google, and in many organizations, is done collaboratively by teams. The team is the molecular unit where real production happens, where innovative ideas are conceived and tested, and where employees experience most of their work. But it’s also where interpersonal issues ,ill-suited skill sets, and unclear group goals can hinder productivity and cause friction. Google researchers applied a similar method to discover the secrets of effective teams.Code-named Project Aristotle - a tribute to Aristotle’s quote,"the whole is greater than the sum of its parts" (as the Google researchers believed employees can do more working together than alone) - the goal was to answer the question:“What makes a team effective?".

Suggested Questions:
Define what makes a "team"
Define "Effectiveness"
What are the two requirements for having a perfect team?
Tell me more about the Minds Eye Test
How is the team's IQ impacted by these requirements?
How has the pandemic and more virtual meetings made this more challenging?

WHAT IS YOUR CLE? (COLLECTIVE LEADERSHIP EFFECTIVENESS)

IBM interviewed over 1,500 CEOs worldwide to learn what their challenges are and their strategies for addressing them.Two challenges emerged at the top of the list: 1) escalating complexity, and 2) building the creative capacity and leadership to deal with it.
Leadership development programs of today are not up to the challenge. Most approaches to developing leaders focus primarily on developing competency and capability. These approaches are insufficient in a world of escalating complexity. We need to develop capability, to be sure, but we need to do much more. We need to develop the complexity of mind of the leader because, if the complexities of the challenges we face are more complex than we are, we are outmatched. But if we can evolve the complexity of the mind of the leader, to be equal to the complexity of the challenge, we can lead.
“The development of leadership effectiveness must, at a minimum, keep pace with the rate of change and the rate of escalating complexity. Not to keep pace with the rate of escalating complexity is to become less relevant and effective. If the challenges we face are more complex than we are, our leadership is inadequate and a competitive disadvantage.” - Bob Anderson

Suggested Questions:
Tell us about Complexity vs Complicatedness
What is at risk by having a low CLE?
How do you know if
your leadership is developing at the pace to stay relevant?
How do you track the effectiveness of leadership over time to gauge improvement?

Company Information

Company Type: Company
Last Media Interview: 05/05/2022

Areas of Expertise

Business Strategy 32.48
Change Management
Culture 30.13
Diversity and Inclusion
Entrepreneurship 38.36
Future of Work 30.09
Innovation
Leadership 32.05
Management 32.15
Mental Health 48.36
Mergers and Acquisitions
Project Management
Sales
Startups 42.27
Supply Chain
Sustainability 30.51
COVID19 32.31
Business Continuity 58.69
Health and Wellness 30.18
Health and Safety 30.53

Industry Experience

Aerospace & Defense
Chemicals
Financial Services & Banking
Healthcare
High Tech & Electronics
Higher Education & Research
Insurance
Manufacturing
Oil & Gas
Pharmaceuticals
Professional Services

Publications

1 Academic Fellow / Scholar
Fellow Harvard Medical School, Institute of Coaching
Harvard Institute of Coaching
April 18, 2022
The Institute of Coaching at McLean, Harvard Medical School Affiliate, is a non-profit organization dedicated to ensuring scientific integrity in the field of coaching. Our mission is to disseminate the best coaching science and empower you to catalyze positive change in yourself, your community, and the world around you.

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Tags: Mental Health

21 Article/Blogs
Dumbfounded
LinkedIn
May 16, 2022
We've all heard them: quotes that impact us and stick with us long after we first hear them. A quote that just makes you stop and think? One that has such a powerful message, it impacts the way you view life? I remember reading this one from my friend Robert Hargrove Realize an Impossible Future.

"If you ask great performers what percent of winning is mental and what percent is action, they will say 80 percent mental, 20 percent action. Yet, if you ask them what they are doing to create a winning mindset, they will look at you dumbfounded?"

It's been my experience that how we think directly impacts what we do and how successful we are. In fact, from that point forward I paid close attention to my mindset and the results have been outstanding.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Entrepreneurship, Startups

Character Checklist
LinkedIn
May 06, 2022
Every now and then, we all need a reminder of who we are and what's important to us. Leaders are no exception. That's why I've put together a character checklist for leaders to help keep them on track. This checklist can act as a daily or weekly reminder of the values that are important to you and the behaviors that support them. Use it to self-assess and make sure you're staying true to your character. And if you find yourself slipping, use it as a tool to get back on track. So, without further ado, here is my character checklist for leaders!

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Tags: Culture, Entrepreneurship, Leadership

Remember the Heart
LinkedIn
May 06, 2022
Some people think that you should lead with your head, making logical decisions based on data and reason. Others believe that you should lead with your heart, putting emotions and feelings first. Which approach is better?

As leaders, we are always looking for ways to better ourselves and our team. We read articles, attend workshops, and try to soak up any bit of information we can get our hands on. But sometimes we can forget the most important thing – leading with our hearts. When we focus too much on the head, we lose sight of what is really important. So take a break from the books and articles for a little while, and remember to lead with your heart.

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Tags: Entrepreneurship, Health and Wellness, Mental Health

Do You Like It?
LinkedIn
May 03, 2022
Let me guess. You’re thinking of asking for feedback on that new thing you just created, but before you do, you want to make sure it’s something people will like, right? I get it. It can be tough putting yourself out there and risking rejection. But if what you ultimately want is validation, then don’t bother asking for feedback.

I was recently speaking with a friend who is in the process of starting his own business. He was telling me that he has been asking people for feedback on his product, but what he really wants is validation. He wanted to know if I thought this was a good strategy, and I told him that it wasn’t. If you’re looking for feedback, be prepared to listen to the criticism and make changes accordingly. But if you just want people to tell you that you’re doing a great job, then don’t bother asking for their opinion.

Think of the difference in these two questions:
Do you like it?
How can I improve?

One is asking for validation and the other is asking for feedback.

What are your thoughts?

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Tags: Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Startups

THE COMPLETE LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT APPROACH THAT WORKS
Bridge Point
May 02, 2022
Highly effective leadership is critical to address the many challenges that face organizations today. One factor driving the demand for effective leadership is that businesses, organizations, hospitals, universities and health care institutions are all highly complex organizations, often characterized by numerous professional workforces, departmental silos, ever-changing regulations and global competition. Leaders are tasked with engaging and unifying the various communities, cultures and often unseen motivations within these institutions while maintaining great customer or clinical care and increasing profitability and enrollment.

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Tags: Management, Leadership, Entrepreneurship

Failing Up
LinkedIn
May 02, 2022
One of the most important—and least discussed—skills in the workplace is the ability to “fail up.” That is, the ability to turn setbacks and failures into opportunities for advancement. This is not a skill that is evenly distributed among employees. Some people are simply better at it than others. And, often, these people are not the sharpest minds or hardest workers. So, what is their secret? In many cases, it boils down to two things: leaders and learnings.

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Tags: Business Strategy, Leadership, Management

This or That - Be Choosy
LinkedIn
May 02, 2022
We've all heard the saying "you can't be choosy when you're starving." But what about when you're not starving, but rather seeking to lead a successful and fulfilling life? The truth is, great leaders know how to be choosy. They don't just take any opportunity that comes their way; they carefully consider the pros and cons of each choice before making a decision. This isn't always easy, but it's essential if you want to make the most of your time and energy.

You've got a lot of options as a leader. You can choose to lead with your head or your heart. You can be aggressive or passive. You can be directive or laissez faire. Sooner or later, you have to make decisions and choose.

If you want to be a great leader, you need to know how to be choosy. This means being selective about the people and things you invest your time and energy in. Here are three reasons why being choosy is so important for leaders:

1) You'll have more energy for the things that matter.
2) You'll be better able to focus on your goals.
3) You'll build stronger relationships.

So don't be afraid to be choosy – it'll make you a better leader for it.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Business Strategy, Entrepreneurship

Appreciate Those Who Failed
LinkedIn
April 29, 2022
Should we be more humble and appreciative of those who have failed, regardless of their status or position in life?

It seems like we are always in awe of those who succeed and dismissive of those who fail. We put those who succeed on pedestals and dismiss those who fail. We put so much emphasis on being successful and having everything go our way, that when things don't go according to plan we start to doubt ourselves.

We all know those people who have achieved incredible things. They're always in the spotlight, and we can't help but be in awe of their accomplishments. But what about the people who have failed? It seems we're quick to dismiss them and forget about them, as if their experience means nothing. We see them as failures and deem them unworthy of our time or attention. I wonder if we should be more self-aware of being so in awe of those who succeed and dismissive of those who fail, and start learning from everyone's experiences.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Business Strategy, Mental Health

National Emergency
LinkedIn
April 29, 2022
On March 13, 2020, by proclamation 9994, the President declared a national emergency concerning the coronavirus pandemic. It appears we may be coming to the end of the emergency declaration and transitioning into a state of virus management. We see many companies and leaders starting to transition to these new realities. Goldman Sachs has demanded all employees return to the office immediately to their 44-story headquarters in lower Manhattan. Only half of the employees returned. CEO David Solomon could not have been pleased. Was this an anomaly or a signal of what's to come?

There's no doubt that when a crisis hits, it's important to take stock of the situation and figure out what needs to be done. But once the immediate emergency is over, it's also important to look for opportunities that might have arisen as a result of the crisis. Whether it's reorganizing your team or rethinking your business strategy, there are always chances to learn and grow after a tough situation.

Now is a good time to assess the opportunities that have arisen as a result of the crisis. Take advantage of this time of chaos to make positive changes in your company.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Entrepreneurship, Startups

Nothing is Easy
LinkedIn
April 18, 2022
Does our attitude matter when it comes to choosing our outlook perspective? In other words, can we change our attitude if we don’t like our current outlook perspective?

In life, we are constantly given choices to make. Sometimes these choices are big and other times they are small, but in the end, each choice we make has an impact on our lives. This is especially true when it comes to our outlook on life – the perspective from which we choose to view the world.

"Nothing is easy as it looks, everything takes longer than you expect, and if anything can go wrong, it will and at the worst possible moment."

OR

"Nothing is as hard as it looks, everything is more rewarding than you expect, and if anything can go right, it will and at the best possible moment."

So which perspective should you go with? And how do you make a decision?

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Tags: Business Continuity, Entrepreneurship, Startups

Look at ME!
LinkedIn
April 14, 2022
There is often a fine line between self-promotion and bragging, especially when it comes to leaders in the workplace. While there may be some situations where highlighting your accomplishments or capabilities is necessary, such as during performance evaluations or team-building exercises, it is important to tread carefully so as not to come across as arrogant or conceited. Ultimately, whether you are self-promoting or simply bragging depends on your intentions and the context of your message. If you are motivated by a desire to improve yourself or your team and seem genuinely modest in doing so, then you are probably engaging in healthy self-promotion. However, if your words seem over the top or disingenuous, then you may be venturing into the territory of bragging. The key is to be authentic and confident without being excessive in your claims about yourself or others. After all, leaders do not need to brag about themselves in order to inspire others; their actions often speak louder than their words.


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Tags: Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Management

From Uncertainty to Chaos
Leadershum
April 13, 2022
From uncertainty to chaos, the pandemic accelerated our transition from VUCA to BANI. Now add a potential WWIII.

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Tags: Business Strategy, COVID19, Leadership

Tricks of the Trade
LinkedIn
April 13, 2022
Do you ever feel like you're constantly behind the curve? Like you're trying to learn new things but never seem to make any progress? You're not alone. It can be tough to keep up with the latest trends, especially in today's fast-paced world. But there's one thing you should remember: it's better to learn the trade than the tricks of the trade.

I have coached hundreds of new managers who start their first 90 days desperate for shortcuts and hacks. Day after day they find themselves losing much needed momentum and gaining distrust from their new team.

The point - it's more important to become an expert in your field than it is to know all the shortcuts and hacks. And that's something worth keeping in mind, especially as you continue your journey towards success.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Entrepreneurship, Startups

Boost Your Career - Flashing Those Pearly Whites
LinkedIn
April 12, 2022
You know how it is when someone smiles at you and you can’t help but smile back? It’s because smiling is contagious – the act of seeing a smile makes you want to smile. Research has shown that when people see happy faces, their brain activity actually changes in a way that makes them feel happier too.

In 'The Brief History of the Smile', Angus Trumble writes -
"In the early 1960s State Mutual Life Assurance of Worcester, MA initiated a merger that had bad effects on company morale. In 1964, State Mutual cooked up a "friendship campaign" to get employees to smile whenever they answered the phone, paid a claim, or typed a report. The company turned to Harvey Ball for graphic support. Ball reported that he spent about 10 minutes designing the smiley face, and he was paid $45 for it. This was the only profit that Ball ever made from his most famous creation. Neither Ball nor the insurance company trademarked or copyrighted the smiley face. In the early 1970s, the smiley face image became a symbol for an entire generation of Americans, emerging as one of the most well-known images in the country."

So the next time someone offers you a compliment, or does something nice for you, don't be afraid to smile big! Leaders who smile tend to be perceived as more competent, trustworthy, and likable. So if you’re looking to boost your career, start by flashing those pearly whites.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Entrepreneurship, Startups

Excellence Is Not A Hill To Climb
LinkedIn
April 07, 2022
In 1930, a graduate student at the University of Chicago named Kurt Lewin proposed his theory of Field Theory. Field Theory maintains that we cannot understand any aspect of an individual or group's behavior without understanding their environment and the field in which they are operating. In other words, individuals do not exist in a vacuum - their actions are always influenced by their surroundings. This is certainly something to keep in mind when striving for excellence.

When people talk about excellence, they always make it sound like this big thing you have to climb. Like it's this mountain you have to surmount, and once you do, you're excellent. But that's not true at all! Excellence is right here, in the next five minutes.

Every decision we make, every action we take, has the potential to elevate us to a new level of greatness.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Entrepreneurship, Startups

Winning Isn't Everything; It's The Only Thing
LinkedIn
March 31, 2022
It seems like a lot of you are cheating at Wordle! Since The New York Times bought Wordle at the end of January of 2022, cheating has been at an all-time high among Wordle users. According to a recent study by Wordfinderx.com, the biggest cheaters are in New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Washington D.C. and Vermont.

Conventional wisdom says "winning isn't everything; it's the only thing." With that in mind, plenty of business leaders believe ethics and honesty are all well and good, as long as they don't get in the way of winning.

One of the most difficult things to do as a leader is to resist the temptation to cheat. Whether it's taking credit for someone else's work, cutting corners, or even outright cheating, it can be tough to stay on the right path when the pressure is on. But if you're tempted to cheat, don't give in. Not only will you likely get caught, but also cheating will ultimately destroy your integrity and credibility.

Because even if you appear to "win" through cheating, you're making your team less effective, driving away your best people, and setting yourself up to be cheated in turn.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Entrepreneurship, Startups

Is your leadership developing at the pace to stay relevant?
Leadershum
March 22, 2022
In 2010, IBM interviewed over 1,500 CEOs worldwide to learn what their challenges are and their strategies for addressing them (Capitalizing complexity: Insights from the Global Chief Executive Officer Study). Two challenges emerged at the top of the list: 1) escalating complexity, and 2) building the creative capacity and leadership to deal with it.

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Tags: Business Strategy, Leadership, Management

Find Believable People
LinkedIn
March 22, 2022
As a leader, it's important to be able to see both sides of every issue. But sometimes, that's easier said than done. If you find yourself disagreeing with someone, it can be tempting to just write them off as wrong and move on. However, there is value in understanding why the other person believes what they do. The key is to find the most believable person who disagrees with you on something important, and really try to understand their reasoning. It may just change your mind. By taking the time to understand their reasoning, you can become a better leader.

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Tags: Business Strategy, Leadership, Mental Health

Create a Prosperous Future
LinkedIn
February 18, 2022
I need your help! I am working on an article and I would love to hear what you think. What trends are you seeing or anticipating in the near future when it comes to leadership and teams?

As the world continues to change and grow, so too must the way we work. For future leaders, this means being adaptable and open-minded in order to embrace new opportunities. The future of work will likely be more collaborative, with a focus on team building and social skills. Technology will also play a big role, with artificial intelligence and digital platforms becoming increasingly commonplace. To be successful in this ever-changing landscape, future leaders will need to be able to think outside the box and be comfortable with change. By doing so, they can help create a future that is prosperous for all.

The trends I am seeing are in these areas:

1. Fairness and equity will be the defining issues for organizations.
2. To compete in the war for knowledge worker talent, some companies will shorten the work week rather than increase pay.
3. Employee turnover will continue to increase as hybrid and remote work become the norm for knowledge workers.
4. The chief purpose officer will be the next major C-level role.

I need high participation on this post. I really want to know what you're seeing and thinking.

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Tags: Business Strategy, Future of Work, Leadership

If our strategy is so good, why is our performance so bad?
LinkedIn
February 08, 2022
Have you ever had one of those days where everything goes wrong? You know, the kind of day where your computer crashes, your coffee spills, and your boss is in a bad mood? Well, organizations can have those sorts of days too - except when they last for months or years. That's when you have to wonder: if our strategy is so good why is our performance so bad?

If you want to achieve exceptional results, then everything must come together. You need a clear vision, passion for what you’re doing, and the drive to work hard every day. Only then will you be able to achieve your biggest goals and aspirations.

From studying the most successful strategies ever created, the ability to execute comes down to these three things: Courage, Discipline and Humility.

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Tags: Business Strategy, Entrepreneurship, Startups

4 WAYS TO GIVE FEEDBACK THAT RIPS THE BLINDERS OFF
Bridgepoint Leadership Talks
February 07, 2022
Feedback is something that we all know is extremely important, yet often we shoot from the hip. Where there should be leadership intentionality there is leadership immaturity. How can you provide feedback that makes a difference? What if your goal is to provide feedback with enough impact people drop their “I’ve got it all together act” and start to see themselves as others see you them. For this to happen you must become someone who can walk into a situation and see things that others do not see, giving people penetrating insight into the situation.

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Tags: Leadership, Culture, Business Strategy

1 eBook
Remember When
Amazon Kindle
December 27, 2022
Remember When is a powerful resource for leaders looking to build strong, positive cultures within their organizations. Through the exploration of oral tradition and the importance of shared experiences, this e-book shows how remembering and storytelling can foster connection, engagement, and a sense of community among employees. Whether you're seeking to inspire your team, teach valuable lessons, connect with a remote team or simply create lasting connections in the workplace, Remember When offers practical insights and strategies for leveraging the power of storytelling and shared memories. Get your copy today and discover the transformative impact of remembering on company culture.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

1 Founder
Bridgepoint Coaching & Strategy Group
Bridgepoint
January 01, 2007
Bridgepoint Coaching & Strategy Group is a strategic coaching firm specializing in coaching, training and leadership development. Our team of coaches are committed to working with organizations to improve their financial performance by unlocking full functionality of each person within an organization. We believe that people need to be reminded more often than they need to be instructed. We partner with companies for an immediate and lasting impact on financial performance and corporate culture by engaging from the front-line to senior executives. Our process is all about people, and most definitely about results.

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Tags: Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Management

9 Influencer Awards
Top 10 Global Thought Leader - Business Continuity
Thinkers360
August 26, 2022
The holder of this credential participated actively in building their profile, portfolio and media kit on Thinkers360 and successfully placed within the Top 10 thought leaders and influencers in this category based on their personally-authored content, awards and recognition.

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Tags: Business Continuity

Top 50 Global Thought Leaders and Influencers on Mental Health 2022
Thinkers360
August 15, 2022
Here’s the Thinkers360 live leaderboard for our top 50 global thought leaders and influencers on Mental Health for 2022. Congratulations to all our thought leaders and experts who participated!

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Tags: Mental Health

The Year’s Most Popular Articles from Thinkers360 Thought Leader
Thinkers360
June 16, 2022
We’ve searched the Thinkers360 Member Blog to pick out the year-to-date’s most popular articles on business, technology and sustainability from Thinkers360 thought leaders. Here’s our picks with direct links to the articles as well as to the author’s thought leadership profiles and portfolios on Thinkers360!

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Tags: Business Continuity

100 Coaches Agency
100 Coaches Agency - C-Suite Coach
June 15, 2022
The world’s best coaches for the world’s top leaders

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Tags: Business Strategy

Top 50 Thought Leader - Mental Health
Thinkers360
June 01, 2022
Top 50 thought leaders and influencers in this category based on their personally-authored content, awards and recognition.

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Tags: Mental Health

Top 50 Thought Leader in Entrepreneurship
Thinkers360
May 20, 2022
Top 50 thought leaders and influencers in this category based on their personally-authored content, awards and recognition.

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Tags: Entrepreneurship

Top 25 Thought Leader - Business Continuity
Thinkers360
May 17, 2022
The holder of this credential participated actively in building their profile, portfolio and media kit on Thinkers360 and successfully placed within the Top 25 thought leaders and influencers in this category based on their personally-authored content, awards and recognition.

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Tags: Business Continuity

LeadersHum Certified Partner
LeadersHum
April 04, 2022
Leadership has a new normal- An open gathering of leaders, thinkers and coaches.

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Tags: Leadership

Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches
Marshall Goldsmith
October 06, 2020
100 Coaches are highly accomplished and compassionate people, each one committed to using their talents to make good people and organizations better. Together, we create a unique spectrum of talent including the world’s leading executive coaches, consultants, speakers, authors, iconic leaders, entrepreneurs and non-profit leaders.

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Tags: Leadership

2 Keynotes
Complexity vs Complicatedness
Colorado Society of Association Executives (CSAE)
June 03, 2021
There is no question the world is experiencing complexity and complicatedness on unprecedented levels. Which of these should be permissible in your environment and which should not be tolerated? In the midst of this mayhem, your responsibility for coaching and mentoring leaders takes on added importance. What are the differences between leadership development vehicles? Does it matter and if it does, how much does it matter? What is the role of CLE (Collective Leadership Effectiveness)? It’s probably an unfamiliar term, but you’ll learn what happens to complexity and complicatedness when CLE is too low, and how to use coaching and mentoring to increase your CLE.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Entrepreneurship, Leadership

Where Strategy Meets the Bottom Line
Salt Lake SHRM Talent Management Conference
January 10, 2017
You can look forward to the following topics:

- Economic Impact on Identifying and Hiring Great Talent
- 4 Pillars of Recruiting
- Building a Brand
- Where Strategy Meets the Bottom Line
- Data Analytics and Trends
- Social Media Recruiting Strategies
- Basics of How to Build a Succession Plan
- Retention Practices and Strategies
- Onboarding and New Hire Experience

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Tags: Business Continuity, Business Strategy, Entrepreneurship

13 Media Interviews
Insights Sharing
Insights Sharing
January 02, 2023
I recently had the pleasure of being interviewed by Noi Ha Nguyen from Ho Chi Minh City. It was an hour that I will be forever grateful for, as it allowed me to reflect on my journey as a young leader to become an executive coach.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Insight Sharing
YouTube
December 29, 2022
Soon we will welcome 2023. We wish it is a good year to all of you. And to help you to start the year in the right mode, we are going to introduce our next four guests in our #InsightsSharing show in the first week of the new year. You will hear stories from Bev Kaye, DEAN MILES, Dan Gingiss and Pravir Malik, Ph.D. Lots of good advice from these amazing people.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Let's Talk Leadership with Dean Miles
Leadershum
June 16, 2022
I had a great conversation with Aditya Sahu from leadersHum.

Some of the questions Aditya asked:

How do you think leadership has evolved over time to what it is today?

What do you think are the attributes of the perfect team?

How do you train someone to lead during a crisis?

Share some wisdom with our viewers?

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Managing & Measuring Team Efforts
The Brand Called You
May 05, 2022
Businesses today deal with providing problem-solving goods and services. It is always the team efforts that lead to collaborative problem solutions than working alone. In order to accomplish the goals in the competitive business environment today, team leadership is key. The leaders ought to motivate their followers and lead them to follow the path to accomplish the common goals.

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Tags: Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Management

GRACE under pressure: John Baldoni with Dean Miles
Grace Under Pressure
January 27, 2022

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Tags: Management, Leadership, Business Strategy

Great Leaders Start As Great Followers
Eternal Leadership
March 04, 2020
Join us as we talk with Dean Miles, founder and president of Bridgepoint Coaching and Strategy Group. Dean’s past experience working with the Drug Enforcement Administration paired with his sales and business experience has helped him learn about body language, management, and how we react when faced with the truth. His goal is not to heap more instruction, but to remind people of what they already know to be true.

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Tags: Management, Leadership, Business Strategy

Reasons The Smartest Employees Are Underperforming
Forbes
November 17, 2017
Lack Of Incentives

In his book Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, Daniel Pink highlights research confirming some incentives can cause significant impact on performance. The more "smarts" required by the employee, the more they can be negatively impacted by incentives. Managers need to look for three things: autonomy (let them make decisions), mastery (give opportunities for them to get better), and purpose (what is their "why?"). - Dean Miles, Bridgepoint Coaching & Strategy Group

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Tags: Business Strategy, Entrepreneurship, Startups

Signs A Manager Needs Outside Help
Forbes
February 01, 2017
Take Time To Linger

Before going outside, linger a little longer with your team. The question is, when does lingering turn to loitering? Look at the 4 C's of execution: clarify, confirm, communicate and connect. When there is a people problem one of these 4 C's is lacking. If you still find yourself unsettled, it may be a blindspot. At this point you are not running from a problem; you are running to a solution. - Dean Miles, Bridgepoint Coaching & Strategy Group

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Tags: Business Strategy, Entrepreneurship, Startups

For C-Suite Executives Struggling With The Blues
Forbes
November 02, 2016
Change Your Perspective

Assuming it's not clinical depression but more of discontent, it is time to get real. You must muster up the courage to change your perspective. Do you really hate your job, or have you complained about it so much to others that you think you do? Remember, you are not your circumstances, these circumstances are real, but they are not you. Remember your future is fine and your present isn't final. - Dean Miles, Bridgepoint Coaching & Strategy Group

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Tags: Business Strategy, Entrepreneurship, Startups

Ways For New Leaders To Develop Their Leadership Skills
Forbes
June 17, 2016
Pursue Feedback

Ken Blanchard says, "Feedback is the breakfast of champions." Excellent leaders are characterized by aggressively pursuing feedback. You will never graduate with a degree in leadership from the school of "no news is good news." After most "enlightening" experiences, circle back and ask what went well and what could've been better. Be relentless in your pursuit of receiving feedback. – Dean Miles, Bridgepoint Coaching & Strategy Group

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Tags: Business Strategy, Entrepreneurship, Startups

Ways To Manage Your Relationship With Your Boss
Forbes
June 15, 2016
Understand Pretty Clear Vs. Really Clear

When you go to the eye doctor he will ask you to look at a picture. He will then switch the lenses and will ask you which one is more clear, A or B? There is a significant difference between pretty clear and really clear. When you think about your relationship with your boss are the expectations pretty clear or really clear? When you think of successfully managing your relationship, think crystal. – Dean Miles,Bridgepoint Coaching & Strategy Group

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Tags: Business Strategy, Entrepreneurship, Startups

Ways CEOs Can Avoid Alienating Their Management Teams
Forbes
June 08, 2016
Clarify, Communicate, Confirm, Connect

These four C's are required for communication. Often CEOs clarify and communicate, and that's where the conversation ends and the communication wheels come off the bus. Make sure you spend at least half your conversation time confirming and connecting with your management team. A challenge: Ask your team what three areas are most important right now. You will be shocked by their answers. – Dean Miles, Bridgepoint Coaching & Strategy Group

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Tags: Business Strategy, Entrepreneurship, Startups

So, what is Executive Coaching and what makes it so valuable?
Mountain West Credit Union Association
December 09, 2015
Dean, what is Executive Coaching and why is it something leaders should consider?

A: In 1999 a Fortune Magazine cover story discussed the failures of prominent CEO’s and came to the conclusion that the emphasis generally placed on strategy and vision created a mistaken belief that the right strategy is all that’s needed to succeed. They found that 70% of the time, the real problem wasn’t bad strategy – it was poor execution. We can all relate to that, can’t we? For most of my clients, the problem is not a shortage of knowledge or good ideas. The problem is in the application of that knowledge and the execution of those ideas. That’s one of the main reasons why coaching is such a great resource.

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Tags: Management, Leadership, Business Strategy

4 Podcasts
The Coaches Commonplace
youtube
September 19, 2022
The Coaches Commonplace is a candid extention to the School for Good Living Podcast. My co-host and fellow member of the Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches group, Dean Miles, joins me to dive deeper into what it means to be a coach, find fulfillment, and ultimately to live good lives. This series includes several fun thinking activities where we explore quotations and news articles.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Coaches Commonplace: Wisdom of the Pages
Youtube
July 19, 2022
Dean Miles is a fellow member of the Marshall Goldsmith 100 coaches group. Dean joins me in this special series where we dive into some of our philosophies about coaching and good living.

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Tags: Startups, Business Continuity, Mental Health

Coaches Commonplace
Youtube
June 29, 2022
Today my friend Dean Miles, a fellow member of the Marshall Goldsmith 100 coaches group, joins me for a new podcast series called the Coaches Commonplace Book. Tune in to hear our thoughts on fulfillment, coaching, and good living.
In this special coaches' commonplace book episode, we explore a new thought activity where we read the headline of a magazine cover and share what things we would include if we were to write the articles ourselves.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Tune in to hear our thoughts on fulfillment, coaching, and good living.
Youtube
May 31, 2022
We are hoping Coaches Commonplace will become your place you can return to often for tidbits: quotes, anecdotes, observations, and information gleaned from books, conversations, movies, song lyrics, social posts, podcasts, life experiences on the topics of coaching, leadership and entrepreneurship.

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Tags: Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Startups

9 Quotes
How Do I Stop Feeling Like An Imposter At Work?
Leadershum
August 29, 2022
Do you ever think you are not as capable as others think you are and you’re afraid that they will find out? Sometimes we all feel like we don't deserve our accomplishments in the workplace and hold ourselves back from taking risks that might actually push us ahead.

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Tags: Mental Health

10 Ways To Manage Your Relationship With Your Boss
Michelle Tillis Lederman
May 05, 2021
Understand Pretty Clear Vs. Really Clear

When you go to the eye doctor he will ask you to look at a picture. He will then switch the lenses and will ask you which one is more clear, A or B? There is a significant difference between pretty clear and really clear. When you think about your relationship with your boss are the expectations pretty clear or really clear? When you think of successfully managing your relationship, think crystal. – Dean Miles, Bridgepoint Coaching & Strategy Group

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Tags: Management

Underperformance and how it can be managed
Business & Financial Times
December 07, 2020
In his book Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, Daniel Pink highlights research confirming some incentives can cause significant impact on performance. “The more ‘smarts’ required by the employee, the more they can be negatively impacted by incentives. Managers need to look for three things: autonomy (let them make decisions), mastery (give opportunities for them to get better), and purpose (what is their ‘why?’).” – Dean Miles, Bridgepoint Coaching & Strategy Group.

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Tags: Business Strategy

16 Ways To Change Your Negative Outlook On Feedback
Career Pro Inc
July 27, 2018
Just Say Thank You

For most of us, the question isn’t “Do I desire feedback at this moment?” Feedback is coming our way whether we want it or not. What we can control is our response. Let the core of your response be a simple and authentic, “thank you.” This creates a mindset shift from “I am in trouble” to “I am so glad you let me know.” – Dean Miles, Bridgepoint Coaching & Strategy Group

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Tags: Entrepreneurship

More Than Just Money: Employee Incentives Drive Productivity and Improve Retention
Inc Magazine
May 30, 2018
That’s the key component in creating strong incentive programs, says Dean Miles, founder and resident of Colorado Springs-based Bridgepoint Coaching and Strategy Group. “[I]f you can add authentic recognition that’s sincere and personal, then it takes that item you select to a whole new level,” he says.

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Tags: Leadership

Blind Spots That Plague Even The Best Leaders
Fast Company
April 05, 2018
Even the most iconic leaders have blind spots. Here’s how to spot the ones that could be dangerous–and keep the ones that are actually beneficial.

Communication is another area where leaders tend to overestimate their ability, says Dean Miles, “There is a disconnect between what their leaders think has been connected, confirmed, clarified, and communicated, and what has really happened.”

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Tags: Leadership

How To Build Your Personal Coaching Brand And Get Clients To Trust You
BlueCase
December 19, 2017
Have A Great Squad
Taylor Swift made “the squad” popular again. It started with Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis Jr. -- the Rat Pack. Your brand needs a squad. When your brand is associated with the ICF, Forbes, Harvard, Georgetown, these are brands they already know, like and trust. As a recent Forbes article stated, "having positive brand perception is key to being remarkable to the space." - Dean Miles, Bridgepoint Coaching & Strategy Group

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Tags: Business Strategy

19 Tricks To Shift Your Mind Toward Optimism
Medium
June 26, 2017
Get The Temper Tantrum Out Of Your System
I know a leader who gives her team 10 minutes to holler, wine, complain, moan and fully express a temper tantrum. Then once this is out of their system, the individuals come back together and look at the opportunity with a more optimistic outlook. To the level you are authentic in your challenging and complaining, the more likely you will be able to support and see what’s possible. –Dean Miles,Bridgepoint Coaching & Strategy Group

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Tags: Business Strategy

10 Tips For An Incentive Program That Goes Beyond Compensation
Forbes
March 01, 2017
Traditionally, we think of incentives as a payment or concession to stimulate greater output or investment. Instead, define incentives as a thing that motivates or encourages one to do something again and again. The greatest incentive that is both sustainable and economical for a large business is positive recognition. High performing teams give four positive pieces of recognition for every one negative. - Dean Miles, Bridgepoint Coaching & Strategy Group

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Tags: Leadership

1 Video
Dean Miles & Brilliant Miller
Youtube
August 16, 2022
Dean Miles is a fellow member of the Marshall Goldsmith 100 coaches group. Dean joins me in this special series where we dive into some of our philosophies about coaching and good living.

Join us in this episode of the Coaches Commonplace Book where we dive into the information that we have been consuming recently, what things we have been learning from that information, emotional fitness, emotional resiliency, and a bit about making money and influencing others as a coach.

“There’s what you achieve and then there’s being happy. Don’t blend those two together.”

This week on the School for Good Living Podcast:
• An update on Dean and Brilliant’s information Diet
• Spending time and learning from Marshall Goldsmith
• Wisdom of the Pages
o Brilliants magazine article “Damn Good Advice for Fathers”
o Dean’s magazine article “Six Ways to Spend a Mental Health Day”
• How to be a coach

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

1 Webinar
Leaders Living Their Values and Showing Up Credibly
LinkedIn
May 28, 2022
Come and share how you live your values and show up credibly in business and in life. Will have experts and you (if you're interested) add to this lively conversation.

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Tags: Startups, Business Continuity, Mental Health

4 Webinars
Crisis-proof you Talent Management Process
Bridgepoint Leadership Talks
April 21, 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic is disrupting many talent processes. But it doesn’t need to stop them. From talent reviews to hiring to assessments, companies are converting in-person processes to virtual formats at a dizzying pace. Learnings to apply and pitfalls to avoid when creating virtual experiences that are built to withstand COVID-19 and in the long term, accelerate the workforce of the future.

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Tags: Leadership, Sustainability

Learning To Manage Your Emotions In A COVID-19 World with Dr. Mayfield
Bridgepoint Leadership Talks
April 20, 2020
Dr. Mayfield will be discussing the importance of understanding our emotional responses during this difficult time and will provide practical tips on how to better manage our emotions.

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Tags: COVID19, Entrepreneurship, Leadership

Leading Through Economic Crisis
Bridgepoint Leadership Talks
April 13, 2020
More businesses are closing their doors, the distancing guidelines have been extended until the end of April and a 2 trillion dollar stimulus package was finally approved. People are understandably nervous and the economy is likely to get worse before it gets better. Leading in economic crisis requires clear priorities, strong decision making and a high level of compassion. Join us as we explore how the stimulus package affects you and your organization and how to lead your people through financial crisis.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Business Strategy, Leadership

Leading in a time of crisis
Bridgepoint Leadership Talks
March 24, 2020
Now is a time for leaders to remind yourselves of what your people need you to do, and to pause and think about what type of leader you need to ‘be’ for others. We won’t have all the answers, and silence isn’t an effective response. We need to meet people where they are and understand their concerns, and we want them to stay adaptable and focused as our ways of working and the work itself changes.

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Tags: Management, Leadership, Business Strategy

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74 Article/Blogs
The Fine Line Between Criticism and Jerk Behavior
Thinkers360
January 23, 2023

As an executive coach, I understand that giving criticism is a natural part of being in a leadership position. However, it's essential to consider the impact of your criticism on others and your reputation.

First, it's essential to check and reflect on your tendency to be critical. Are you giving criticism constructively, or is it becoming a negative behavior pattern? Are you providing helpful feedback, or is it just complaining? Being aware of your own tendency to be critical can help you make a conscious effort to give feedback more constructively.

Consider the right balance when giving criticism. While providing feedback and offering constructive criticism is essential, it's also important to recognize and acknowledge the positive aspects of someone's work. Striving for a balance between constructive criticism and recognition can help build trust and respect in your relationships.

It's also worth noting that giving criticism, especially if done negatively or harshly, can impact your reputation. It can be perceived as difficult to work with or damage relationships with colleagues and team members. So, it's essential to be mindful of how you deliver your criticism and strive to be respectful and tactful in your communication.

To help guide you, here's a checklist you can use when giving criticism:

  • Reflect on your tendency to be critical and make a conscious effort to provide feedback in a more constructive way
  • Consider the balance of constructive criticism and recognition
  • Be mindful of how you deliver your criticism and strive to be respectful and tactful in your communication
  • Be aware of how your criticism may impact your reputation and relationships with colleagues and team members

By following this checklist, you can give feedback in a helpful, respectful way and build strong relationships with your team and colleagues. Remember, as a leader, your words and actions have an impact, so it's essential to be mindful and thoughtful in the way you give criticism.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Important Things Take Time
Thinkers360
January 15, 2023

In today's fast-paced world, it can be easy to get caught up in the rush to achieve our goals and meet our deadlines. However, as the ancient Greek philosopher Plato reminds us, "important things take time." This statement not only applies to our professional lives, but also to our personal and intellectual pursuits.

Plato, one of the most influential philosophers in Western thought, believed in the importance of a balance between the "scholarly life" and the "leisurely life." He believed that the pursuit of knowledge and wisdom was essential for a fulfilling life, but that it was also important to take time for leisure and relaxation.

In Plato's Republic, he proposed that the ideal society would be one in which individuals were able to pursue both their intellectual and leisurely interests. He believed that a balance between the two would lead to a well-rounded and fulfilled life. He wrote that "the life which is neither pleasant nor painful is not worth living."

Plato's ideas on the balance between scholarly and leisurely life can be applied to our own lives today. To achieve our goals and reach our full potential, it is important to dedicate time and effort to our work and intellectual pursuits. However, it is also important to take time for leisure and relaxation to recharge and maintain a healthy balance.

It is important to mention that Plato believed that leisure activities should be of the highest quality and that the pursuits should be what we might call "High Leisure" activities. High Leisure activities are leisure activities that are challenging and stimulating, such as reading, writing, playing music, and engaging in conversation with people.

One of the main reasons why important things take time is that they require a significant amount of effort and dedication. For example, learning a new skill or studying for a professional certification can take months or even years. Similarly, building a successful business or pursuing a career in a competitive field can take years of hard work and sacrifice.

Additionally, important things often require a significant amount of patience and perseverance. We may encounter obstacles and setbacks along the way, and it can be easy to become discouraged. However, it is important to remember that these challenges are a natural part of the process and that they can ultimately lead to growth and progress.

One of the key takeaways from Plato's thoughts on the balance between the scholarly and leisurely life is the importance of setting priorities. Identifying what is truly important to us and allocating our time and resources accordingly is essential. This means setting aside time for our work and intellectual pursuits but also taking time to relax and recharge.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Leadership Mastery: How to Listen Like a Leader
Thinkers360
January 13, 2023

As an executive coach working with some of the top leaders in technology, healthcare, and startups, I have noticed a growing trend among my clients: they are talking more than they are listening. This is a concerning trend, as I have found that great leaders are great listeners. They possess the ability to understand what is not said, witnessed, or heard. They understand that knowledge and wisdom are gained by listening, not by talking.

The purpose of communication is to engage, not to message. This is a crucial concept for leaders to understand. When leaders focus too much on broadcasting their message, they miss out on the valuable information and insights that can be gleaned from others. In this age of instant communication, everyone seems to be in such a rush to communicate what’s on their mind that they fail to realize the value of everything that can be gleaned from the minds of others.

To become a better leader, it's crucial to stop talking and start listening. Seek understanding before seeking to be understood. Listen to your customers, competitors, peers, subordinates, and those who care about you. Use social media tools to listen and ask questions to elicit feedback. Remember, the smartest person in the room is not doing all the talking but asking relevant and engaging questions and listening.

One of the leaders' most prominent mistakes is thinking that being heard is more important than listening. This dangerous mindset can lead to poor decision-making, a lack of empathy, and, ultimately, a lack of buy-in from your team. The first rule in communication is to seek understanding before seeking to be understood. Communication is not a one-way street.

I have interviewed and worked with some of the most noted leaders of our time, and to the one, they never miss an opportunity to listen. They aggressively seek out new and better ways to listen. They understand the immense value contained in the old saying, "it’s impossible to stick your foot in your mouth when it’s closed."

Leadership is about action, but leaders who act before they understand tend not to achieve the desired outcome. You are responsible for creating a culture of active listening as a leader. This starts with setting an example. If you want your team to listen, you must be willing to listen to them. Show them that their input is valuable and that you are committed to understanding their perspectives.

You can also create a culture of active listening by providing your team with the tools and training they need to be effective listeners. This might include training on active listening techniques, allowing them to attend workshops, or encouraging them to seek out additional resources.

One of the best ways to create a culture of active listening is by creating an environment where people feel safe to share their thoughts and ideas. This means building a culture of trust and respect. When your team feels their opinions are valued, they will be more likely to speak up and share their thoughts.

As a leader, it's important to remember that listening is not a one-time event. It's an ongoing process that requires commitment and dedication. Set clear expectations and goals, and hold yourself accountable for your progress and follow-up.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Navigating Change in the First Quarter: Insights from Churchill and Welch
Thinkers360
January 06, 2023

As the first quarter of the year begins, leaders may question the strategic initiatives established during off-site meetings in the previous quarter. This can be a complex and nuanced challenge as leaders seek to balance the desire for progress and innovation with the practical constraints of resources and competing priorities.

Leaders must approach this process cautiously, avoiding hasty decisions or prematurely abandoning strategies. It is essential to allow initiatives time to take root and demonstrate results before making changes. Leaders should also seek input from team members and stakeholders before making significant adjustments to strategies or goals.

Another consideration for leaders is the impact of changes on team morale. While it may be necessary to modify strategies or objectives, it is crucial to communicate clearly with team members and involve them in the decision-making process to the greatest extent possible. This can foster a sense of shared ownership and commitment to the organization's success.

The ideas of Winston Churchill and Jack Welch offer two different perspectives on the importance of change in the business world. Churchill's quote, "To improve is to change; to be perfect is to change often," emphasizes the ongoing nature of the improvement process and the need for continual change to achieve success. On the other hand, Welch's advice to "change before you have to" suggests a more proactive approach in which leaders anticipate and address potential challenges before they become problems. Both perspectives offer valuable insights for leaders seeking to manage change effectively and drive progress in their organizations.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

The Power of Humility in Strategy
Thinkers360
January 04, 2023

"However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results."

As an intelligent reader, you have likely heard and internalized the obvious learning in Churchill's quote: that it is important to consider the practical outcomes of our plans. However, another layer of learning can be found in this quote, which is less obvious but no less important.

First, let's consider the context in which Churchill made this statement. He was a leader during a great crisis and understood the importance of adaptability and flexibility in strategy. Even the most well-thought-out plans can go awry, and it is crucial to pivot and adjust our strategies as needed to achieve our goals. By "occasionally looking at the results" of our plans, we can gauge their effectiveness and make necessary changes.

But there is another aspect to this quote that goes beyond just the practical considerations of strategy. It is a reminder that, as smart and knowledgeable as we may be, we do not know everything. We can become so caught up in the beauty and elegance of our own ideas that we forget to consider other perspectives or alternative approaches. By occasionally looking at the results of our strategies, we are forced to confront the reality of our assumptions and consider the possibility that we may be wrong.

This humility is essential to effective leadership and decision-making. It allows us to be open to new information and to continue learning and growing. So the next time you are confident in your own brilliance, take a moment to remember Churchill's words and "look at the results" of your plans. You may discover something new.

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Tags: Startups, Business Continuity, Mental Health

Overcoming Natural Stupidity
Thinkers360
January 03, 2023

According to Amos Tversky, a renowned psychologist, and economist, we should study natural stupidity rather than artificial intelligence. This statement highlights the importance of understanding and addressing the inherent biases and limitations of the human mind.

In today's business world, leaders must make complex decisions daily. It is easy to fall into the trap of relying on mental shortcuts or heuristics rather than taking the time to consider all available information fully. This can lead to flawed decision-making and potentially negative consequences.

By recognizing and acknowledging the concept of bounded rationality, leaders can strive to overcome their biases and make more informed, thoughtful decisions. This can involve seeking diverse perspectives, questioning assumptions, and seeking additional data or information when necessary.

Understanding and addressing natural stupidity is not about being self-critical or hard on oneself. Instead, it is about recognizing that we all have limitations and being proactive in finding ways to overcome them. This can ultimately lead to more effective leadership and better outcomes for organizations.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Why a Bad System Will Always Beat a Good Person
Thinkers360
January 02, 2023

In today's fast-paced, rapidly changing business environment, the modern interpretation of Edwards Deming's famous quote, "a bad system will beat a good person every time," has never been more relevant. In an era of intense competition, organizations need to have systems in place that are designed to improve the quality of their products or services continuously.

But what does it mean to have a "good" system in the modern context? At its core, a good system is flexible, agile, and able to adapt to changing circumstances. It should be designed to empower employees to make decisions and take action rather than holding them back with cumbersome processes and bureaucracy.

In short, a good system enables people to do their best work rather than getting in their way. By investing in the design and implementation of effective systems, organizations can create a culture of continuous improvement, resulting in better outcomes for their customers, employees, and stakeholders.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

The Top 10 Leadership Lessons of the Past 1000 Years
Thinkers360
January 01, 2023

Over the last 1000 years, many lessons have been learned about effective leadership. Some of the most important lessons include:

Leading by example
Empathy and emotional intelligence
Clear communication
Adaptability
Integrity and honesty
Vision and strategic thinking
Decisiveness
Empowerment
Collaboration and teamwork
Lifelong learning

These lessons have been emphasized by leaders throughout history and continue to be relevant today. By incorporating these principles into our leadership style, we can better serve our teams and our organizations and help them to achieve success.

In general, effective leadership involves a combination of these traits and skills. Great leaders can adapt to changing circumstances, communicate clearly, and inspire their teams to work together towards a common goal. They also understand the importance of continuous learning and personal development and are always seeking new ways to improve and grow. By following these principles, we can become more effective leaders and positively impact those around us.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Awe and Well-Being: Why We Need More of This Emotion in Our Lives
Thinkers360
December 26, 2022

As we enter the new year, it's worth considering the role that awe can play in our lives. Awe is a complex emotion characterized by reverence, admiration, and amazement in response to something perceived as vast, consequential, or grand. It's an emotion we don't often think about but can profoundly impact our well-being.

Unfortunately, we seem to be in a critical deficiency of awe these days. With so much of our time and attention consumed by screens and the constant stream of information and stimuli that comes with modern life, it's easy to become numb to the world around us. We might see the beauty and wonder in the world, but it's all too easy to take it for granted.

But our future may depend on cultivating a sense of awe. Research has shown that experiences of awe can have several positive effects on mental and physical health. They can reduce stress and anxiety, increase feelings of social connection, and improve mental well-being. Awe may even be able to slow down the perception of time, allowing us to savor the present moment and appreciate the world around us.

So how can we cultivate a sense of awe in our lives? One way is to seek out experiences that are likely to evoke awe. This might include exploring natural landscapes, attending concerts or other cultural events, or engaging with art and literature. It also includes appreciating the beauty of the everyday world, such as walking in nature or simply looking up at the stars at night.

Another way to cultivate awe is to be open to it. When we're in a rush, it's easy to tune out the world around us and focus on the task. But if we try to be present and open to the world, we're more likely to experience moments of awe. This might involve slowing down and taking the time to see and appreciate what's around us or simply being open to the possibility that something unique or wonderful might happen at any moment.

As we enter the new year, it's essential to be intentional about seeking out and experiencing moments of awe. It might not be easy – the world can be busy and stressful– but our mental and physical health benefits make it worthwhile. So let's resolve to seek out moments of awe in the year ahead and appreciate and savor the beauty and wonder of the world around us.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Finding Your Place: The Message of 'Cheers' and the Yearning for Community
Thinkers360
December 23, 2022

Making your way in the world today

It takes everything you've got

Taking a break from all your worries

Sure would help a lot…

The theme song's lyrics from the popular 1980s sitcom "Cheers," titled "Where Everybody Knows Your Name," speak to the struggles and challenges we all face as we navigate life. The song acknowledges the difficulties of making our way in the world and the relief that can come from taking a break from our worries. These lyrics capture the universal human experience of striving to find our place in the world and to be known and seen by others.

As a teenager and young adult, this song significantly impacted me. Whenever I heard the opening strains of the music, I couldn't help but sing along. The lyrics spoke to the struggles and setbacks we all experience and the comfort of having a place where we feel accepted and supported. For me, this song became a kind of anthem, a reminder that no matter what challenges I faced, there was always a place where I belonged.

Even today, at 52, I still get the feels whenever I hear this song. It brings back memories of my younger years and the struggles and triumphs that shaped me into the person I am today. It also reminds me of the importance of finding and building communities where we feel known and valued, whether in a physical place like a neighborhood bar or online through social media and other digital platforms.

One of the most memorable aspects of the show "Cheers" is how the characters would greet regular patron Norm by yelling his name whenever he walks into the bar. This simple gesture of recognition and welcome spoke to the sense of community and belonging that the show so deftly captured. It's easy to understand why so many people have always wanted a place like that for themselves, where they feel known and welcomed by others.

Finding a place where we belong and are valued by others is incredibly appealing in a world that can often feel impersonal and disconnected. It's no wonder the theme song of "Cheers," with its catchy melody and relatable lyrics, has had such a lasting impact on many people. Who wouldn't want to be a part of a community where "everybody knows your name, and they're always glad you came"?

As you reflect on the lyrics of this song, I would love to hear your thoughts. Have you ever felt you didn't belong or that others didn't value your presence? How have you found or created a sense of community and belonging in your own life?

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

The Power of Resilience: Lessons from the Beatles for the New Year
Thinkers360
December 19, 2022

As we enter a new year, it's natural to feel a sense of renewal and a desire to start fresh. The lyrics of "Here Comes the Sun" perfectly captures this feeling of joy and relief at the arrival of a new year.

As leaders and managers, we can learn a lot from this song about how to approach the new year and the challenges that come with it.

First and foremost, the song reminds us to stay positive and to look for the silver lining in difficult situations. It can be easy to get caught up in negative thinking and focus on all our problems when things are tough. But as the song reminds us, "the smile's returning to their faces," and there is always hope for better days ahead.

To be influential leaders, we must cultivate this positive mindset and inspire others to do the same. We should be encouraging and supportive and look for opportunities to celebrate successes and achievements, no matter how small they may seem.

Another key lesson from "Here Comes the Sun" is the importance of resilience. The song speaks of a "long, cold, lonely winter" and how it feels like "years since it's been here" - a metaphor for the difficult times we all face from time to time.

But the song also suggests that these tough times won't last forever and that the sun will eventually appear again. As leaders, it's essential that we stay strong and resilient through the challenges we face and that we help our teams to do the same. We need to be there for our team members, offering support and guidance when they need it and reminding them that better days are ahead.

Finally, "Here Comes the Sun" is a reminder of the transformative power of hope and optimism. When we're feeling down or discouraged, it can be hard to see a way forward. But as the song suggests, "the ice is slowly melting," and with hope and optimism, we can see things in a new light.

As leaders, we must stay hopeful, even when things seem bleak. We need to be a source of inspiration and encouragement for our teams and help them see the possibilities that lie ahead.

In conclusion, the lyrics of "Here Comes the Sun" offer valuable lessons for leaders and managers as we enter a new year. By staying positive, being resilient, and cultivating hope and optimism, we can create a stable and supportive work environment that helps our teams thrive and succeed. So, this song can be a great source of inspiration for leaders as they approach the new year with renewed energy and determination.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

The Future of AI: Exploring the Potential of Artificial Intelligence
Thinkers360
December 10, 2022

As someone fascinated by the potential of artificial intelligence (AI), I have been exploring how AI can be used in my life and work. While I am impressed by the impressive power of AI and its potential to revolutionize various industries, I also approach it with caution.

One of the critical things I have been considering is how to use AI to increase my efficiency and productivity. For example, I have been experimenting with AI-powered tools to automate specific tasks, such as scheduling meetings and managing my email inbox. While these tools have certainly made certain aspects of my work more accessible, I have also found that it's essential to maintain a certain level of human oversight to ensure that the AI is working as intended.

Another aspect of using AI that I have been thinking about is its potential to improve decision-making. AI algorithms can process large amounts of data and identify patterns and trends that may not be immediately obvious to a human. However, I have also realized that it's essential to understand the limitations of AI and not rely on it blindly. For example, AI algorithms can sometimes make biased or unfair decisions, so it's essential to carefully consider the implications of using AI for decision-making.

The ability to use AI algorithms to create unique and beautiful pieces of art has given me access to a level of creativity that I never thought possible. One of the things I find most exciting about AI art is how it can open up new possibilities for creativity. For example, AI algorithms can be trained to generate unique and intricate patterns and designs, allowing artists to create works that would be impossible for humans to develop. Additionally, AI algorithms can manipulate and transform existing images, allowing artists to explore new ways of seeing and representing the world.

Another advantage of using AI in art is the accessibility it offers. In the past, creating art often required a significant investment of time, money, and resources. However, with the advent of AI, it is now possible for anyone with a computer and an internet connection to create stunning works of art. This has democratized the art world and allowed people from all backgrounds to explore their creative potential.

Of course, AI art also has its limitations and challenges. One of the biggest challenges is the question of authorship and ownership. Because AI algorithms are responsible for creating the art, it can be challenging to determine who should be credited as the artist. Additionally, there are concerns about the ethics of using AI in art, including the potential for AI algorithms to replicate or appropriate the work of human artists.

Overall, I have found that using AI can be incredibly powerful, but it's essential to approach it carefully. I am still figuring out the best ways to use AI in my life and work, but I am excited to continue exploring its potential.

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Tags: Startups, Business Continuity, Mental Health

Rudolph's Nose: A Symbol of Leadership and Adaptability
Thinkers360
December 04, 2022

As we approach the holiday season, it's always a good time to reflect on the messages and lessons found in our favorite Christmas songs. One song that stands out to me as a great example of leadership is "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer."

For those who may not be familiar with the song, it tells the story of Rudolph, a young reindeer with a shiny, red nose that the other reindeer initially ridiculed because of its unusual appearance. Rudolph remains kind and optimistic despite the teasing and exclusion from the other reindeer. His positive attitude and unique qualities eventually catch the attention of Santa Claus, who recognizes Rudolph's potential and asks him to guide his sleigh on a foggy Christmas Eve.

There are several leadership lessons that we can learn from this song, and one of the most important is the importance of recognizing and valuing diversity. In the song, Rudolph's red nose is initially seen as a liability, but it turns out to be his greatest asset. This reminds us that we should not judge people based on their appearance or preconceived notions but instead focus on their abilities and potential.

Another essential leadership lesson from the song is the importance of perseverance and staying true to oneself. Despite the teasing and exclusion from the other reindeer, Rudolph never gives up on his dreams and believes in himself. This is a powerful message for leaders who often face challenges and setbacks. It's essential to stay focused on your goals and not let others' negative opinions discourage you.

The role that Santa Claus plays in Rudolph's success is also noteworthy. Santa recognizes Rudolph's potential and takes a chance on him, allowing him to prove himself. This is a reminder that great leaders are not afraid to take risks and give others a chance to shine. It's essential to trust and empower your team members and provide them with the support and resources they need to succeed.

In today's post-COVID reality, the lessons from "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" are more relevant than ever. The pandemic has highlighted the importance of diversity and inclusion and the need for perseverance and adaptability. As leaders, we must embrace these values and use them to guide our decision-making and support our teams.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Leadership and Power in the Workplace: Lessons from John Wooden and the Oakland Athletics
Thinkers360
December 03, 2022

As a leader, it's essential to be aware of the power dynamics in the workplace and use that power wisely. Great leaders know that with power comes great responsibility, and they use their ability to support and motivate their team members.

For example, a leader might use their power to advocate for their team members, ensuring they have the resources and support needed to do their jobs effectively. This might involve lobbying for additional budget for necessary equipment or training or standing up for their team members in meetings with upper management.

Another way that a leader can use their power is by providing clear direction and guidance to their team. This might involve setting goals and objectives, providing regular feedback and support, and helping team members to develop their skills and capabilities.

But effective leadership is not just about using your power to support and motivate others. It's also about being open to new ideas and approaches and using data and evidence to inform decision-making.

One leader who exemplified these principles was John Wooden, the legendary coach who led the UCLA Bruins men's basketball team to 10 NCAA national championships in 12 years. Wooden was known for his emphasis on fundamentals and his focus on creating a positive team culture.

One of Wooden's key leadership strategies was to focus on the development of each player rather than just the team's success as a whole. He believed that by helping each player to reach their full potential, the team would ultimately be successful. To that end, he spent a great deal of time working with players on their skills and provided them with regular feedback and support.

Another critical element of Wooden's leadership game plan was his emphasis on mental toughness and discipline. Wooden believed that these qualities were essential for success, and he worked to instill them in his players through rigorous practice and conditioning.

Similarly, the Oakland Athletics baseball team, as profiled in the book "Moneyball" by Michael Lewis, used advanced analytics to build a successful team on a limited budget. The team's General Manager, Billy Beane, challenged the traditional scouting methods used by other groups and instead used data and analytics to identify undervalued players and build a successful team. This shows the value of thinking outside the box and using objective evidence to inform decision-making.

Effective leadership is about using your power to empower and support others and being transparent and accountable in your actions. It's also about being open to new ideas and approaches and using data and evidence to inform decision-making. By focusing on these principles, you can foster a positive and productive work environment that drives success for your organization.

 

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Elon Musk: Acting Like an Owner, Not a Leader
Thinkers360
November 28, 2022

Elon Musk is one of the most successful entrepreneurs of our time, and his journey to success is inspiring. But while he’s been celebrated for his accomplishments, his behavior has been polarizing. A significant source of contention is how Musk runs his businesses and interacts with employees. He’s often accused of acting like an owner, not a leader.

Ownership implies a sense of control over outcomes, whereas leadership suggests a sense of responsibility for those outcomes. Owners are focused on results, but leaders focus on people and processes that lead to those results. For example, owners will often push their teams to work harder or faster to achieve an end goal, while leaders will provide guidance and support to help their teams reach those goals sustainably.

Elon Musk's leadership style is often characterized by his "hands-on" approach to business management. He's known for being highly demanding of himself and others, regularly pushing boundaries and taking risks in pursuit of ambitious goals. His focus on results has often led him into conflicts with employees who may be trying to follow established processes or maintain specific standards within their organizations - something which he's generally not willing to do if it hinders progress towards the ultimate goal. This type of ownership mentality can be effective in certain situations but can also create tension between team members and even damage company morale if not appropriately managed.

In today's competitive business environment, leaders must balance ownership and leadership to maximize performance without sacrificing employee satisfaction or ethical standards. Leaders should recognize when they need to take full ownership of a situation or project and when they need to step back and allow their team members more autonomy to feel empowered and engaged in achieving the desired outcome. While Elon Musk's approach may have been successful for him, it may only be suitable for some types of organizations or situations. So leaders must understand the difference between ownership and leadership before deciding how to manage their teams or projects.                                                                                                                                     

Elon Musk is undoubtedly one of the most successful entrepreneurs of our time, and we can learn from his journey - both good and bad - as we strive towards success ourselves. Leaders must recognize that there is a difference between ownership mentality (which focuses on results) and authentic leadership (which focuses on people). Understanding this distinction can help us create an environment where employees feel valued, respected, and appreciated while striving towards ambitious goals together as a team. Doing so requires striking a balance between ownership mentality and authentic leadership –which every leader must strive towards if they hope to succeed in today’s competitive business world.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

The Power of Slowing Down
Thinkers360
November 27, 2022

Do you ever feel like you are constantly running on a hamster wheel yet not making progress? If so, it’s time to slow down. It may seem counterintuitive, but slowing down is essential for getting ahead, noticing, and building meaningful relationships with others.

Slowing down allows us to see things from different perspectives. We can take some time to pause and reflect on our current situation and make necessary changes that will take us closer to our goals. It also allows us to be more mindful of how we interact with others and our environment. When we slow down, we can recognize that the most important things are rarely urgent. As a result, we can use this newfound awareness to prioritize tasks and responsibilities aligned with our values.

In addition, slowing down allows us to connect more deeply with ourselves and those around us. We can establish deeper relationships when we listen more attentively, have meaningful conversations, appreciate the small moments in life, and be present in each moment without distractions or haste. This creates an environment where trust is built between people, and a relationship is fostered through mutual understanding.

When we slow down enough to look within ourselves, we can gain insight into what matters in life—professionally and personally. We can recognize what motivates us and use this to create positive change.

When leaders take the time to slow down instead of rushing through their work or interactions with others, they set an example for their team members and colleagues on how to lead authentically—with integrity and respect for all involved parties. This creates an environment where growth thrives because employees are given space to think independently while still being supported by the leader’s guidance.                         

Whether you’re leading your team or simply trying to reach your own goals—slowing down is essential if you want real progress in any area of your life. Taking the time out of your day (or week) to pause and reflect on everything that has been going on will help you make better decisions and bring clarity on what matters most in life—personally & professionally. So don’t forget—slow down & enjoy life. It's worth it.

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Tags: Startups, Business Continuity, Mental Health

Evaluating Your Goals: Why Did You Fall Short?
Thinkers360
November 26, 2022

It can be challenging for leaders, to be honest about why they didn’t accomplish their goals. We often make excuses or come up with reasons why we didn’t do what we said we would do. If you want your next year to be different, it is essential to take an honest look at what got in the way of achieving your goals and create a successful plan.

The first step in being honest with yourself is acknowledging your mistakes without judgment. Instead of beating yourself up or making excuses, take action and analyze the situation objectively. What were your expectations? What went wrong? Where did you fall short? Identifying these areas can help you understand where you need to focus more effort and attention to reach your desired outcomes.

Once you have identified where things went wrong, it is essential that you take responsibility for your actions (or lack thereof). Taking ownership of our failures is not easy, but it is necessary if we want to reach our goals. Instead of blaming external factors, try to identify what role you played in the situation or whether there was anything else you could have done differently. Once you have taken responsibility for your failure, it will be easier for you to move forward and create a plan for success.

Having an honest conversation with yourself about what went wrong can help inform the decisions that will lead to reaching your desired outcomes next year. Start by setting clear goals and objectives that are specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and timely. Then develop an action plan outlining steps to get you closer to achieving those goals. This should include timelines, resources needed, and any other information necessary for tracking progress along the way so that you stayed on track and motivated toward reaching those goals. 

Being honest with yourself is vital when setting realistic goals and measuring progress toward achieving them. By acknowledging mistakes without judgment, taking responsibility, and creating an actionable plan that outlines goals and objectives, leaders can set themselves up for success in the upcoming year ahead. Honesty truly is the best policy when it comes to goal-setting – good luck!

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

The Power of Silence in the Age of Relentless Self-Promotion
Thinkers360
November 20, 2022

It can be difficult to find silence in a world where we are constantly bombarded with noise. There is always some background noise, whether it’s the tv blaring in the background, our overflowing inboxes, or the constant chatter of people around us. And while this noise can sometimes help motivate or keep us entertained, too often, it leaves us feeling overwhelmed and stressed.

Fortunately, there is power in silence. In a world where we are constantly being told to sell ourselves, be louder, and be more visible, silence can be a breath of fresh air. When we allow ourselves to be silent, we give ourselves permission to breathe, think, and reflect. Silence allows us to recharge our batteries and return to the world with a fresh perspective.

Leaders, in particular, can benefit from the power of silence. In a world where networking is king and self-promotion is expected, leaders can easily get caught up in the need always to be “on.” But the truth is that leaders need time to reflect on their experiences and learn from their mistakes. They need time to think about what they’re doing well and what they could do better. And they need time to plan for the future. Silence provides all of this and more.

So if you’re feeling overwhelmed by the world's noise, take a step back and allow yourself to experience the power of silence. You may find that it’s precisely what you need to reenergize and refocus your goals.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

There Can Be No Power Without Mystery
Thinkers360
November 19, 2022

In his famous quote, Charles de Gaulle emphasized the importance of mystery in both leadership and life. Indeed, there is something intriguing about those who remain stoic in the face of adversity or who always seem to have a "knowing" look in their eyes. This air of mystery can help to capture attention and establish authority. In many ways, it is the silence of a strong person that is most powerful—it speaks volumes without saying a word. For the weak, silence can be a refuge; it allows them to avoid difficult conversations and tough decisions. And for both the proud and the humble, silence is a way to maintain modesty. Ultimately, mystery is a tool that can be used wisely or foolishly. As de Gaulle suggests, it can be a source of strength or a sign of weakness. It all depends on how it is wielded.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

How to Understand and Excel at Workplace Personality Traits
Thinkers360
November 04, 2022

In today's business world, it's no secret that the workplace has become highly competitive. With technology and barriers to entry changing so rapidly, companies are always looking for an edge. And while some may argue that a company's technological advancements or strategic positioning give them an advantage, the truth is that those factors alone are no longer enough in this new world. The key to success in today's business world is understanding personality traits and how they can affect workplace performance.

What are Personality Traits?

Personality traits are "consistent patterns of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors." In other words, they're the things that make us who we are. And while our personality traits might not seem like they have much to do with our professional lives, the truth is that they can significantly impact our ability to succeed in the workplace.

There are four main categories of personality traits: extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and emotional stability. And while each of us falls into one or more of these categories, it's essential to understand that we all fall somewhere on a spectrum. That means that there is no right or wrong answer when it comes to personality traits. Instead, it's about understanding where you fall on the spectrum and using that information to your advantage.

How Personality Traits Affect Workplace Performance

Extraversion: Extraversion is all about outgoingness and social interactions. Those who fall on the extraverted side of the spectrum tend to be more comfortable working in team settings and often excel at networking. If you're looking to advance your career, being extraverted can give you a leg up. However, it's important to remember that being extraverted doesn't mean you have to be extroverted all the time. It's okay to step out of your comfort zone occasionally and challenge yourself to interact with people even if you don't feel like it.

Agreeableness: Agreeableness is all about getting along with others. Those who fall on the agreeable side of the spectrum tend to be more cooperative and less likely to experience conflict in the workplace. If you frequently disagree with co-workers or boss, being more agreeable could help you find common ground and improve your relationships. However, it's important to remember that being agreeable doesn't mean you always have to agree with others. It's okay to stand your ground when you believe strongly in something—ensure you do so respectfully.

Conscientiousness: Conscientiousness is all about being reliable and organized. Those who fall on the conscientious side of the spectrum tend to be punctual, detail-oriented, and able to stay calm under pressure. If you find yourself constantly forgetting deadlines or struggling to stay organized, being more conscientious could help you get ahead. However, it's important to remember that being conscientious doesn't mean you have to be always perfect. It s okay to cut yourself slack every once in a while and recognize that nobody's perfect.

Emotional Stability: Emotional stability is all about managing emotions effectively. Those who fall on the emotionally stable side of the spectrum tend to get along well with others, handle stress well, and stay levelheaded under pressure. If you become easily agitated or angered by coworkers feeling overwhelmed by stress, being more emotionally stable could help improve your relationships and make it easier for you to cope with challenges. However, don't try to repress your emotions altogether. Acknowledging your feelings is an essential part of managing them effectively.

By taking the time to understand your personality traits and how they can affect your work performance, you can put yourself in a better position to excel at work—regardless of how competitive the landscape may be.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

What is Organization Ambidexterity?
Thinkers360
October 27, 2022

What is Organization Ambidexterity?

Ambidexterity is the state of being equally adept at using both left and right hands. When applied to organizations, ambidexterity refers to a company's ability to explore new opportunities while exploiting existing ones.

O'Reilly and Tushman first proposed organizational ambidexterity in 2004. Since then, it has become an increasingly popular research topic within the organizational studies field. There are two primary types of organizational ambidexterity: structural and behavioral. Structural ambidexterity refers to how a company is organized, while behavioral ambidexterity refers to the actions and behavior of employees within the organization. For a company to be truly ambidextrous, it must excel at both types of ambidexterity.

For an organization to be ambidextrous, it must have two distinct but interconnected parts: an exploratory and an exploitative side. The exploratory side is responsible for generating new ideas and experimenting with new ways of doing things. On the other hand, the exploitative side is accountable for taking those ideas and turning them into tangible products or services.

These two sides must be well-connected; otherwise, there will be a disconnect between the organization's ability to generate new ideas and its ability to execute them. For example, suppose the exploratory side comes up with a great new product idea, but the exploitative side doesn't have the resources or expertise to bring it to market. In that case, the organization will never realize the full potential of that idea.

The key to organizational ambidexterity is finding the right balance between exploration and exploitation. Too much focus on either one can lead to problems down the road. For example, if an organization focuses too much on exploitation, it may become bogged down by bureaucracy and lose sight of its original mission. On the other hand, if an organization focuses too much on exploration, it may never bring any of its ideas to fruition. The key is striking a balance between these two activities so that both sides can work together effectively.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

The Dangers of Scope Creep
Thinkers360
October 14, 2022

The Dangers of Scope Creep

Scope creep is a project manager's worst nightmare. The uncontrolled growth of a project's scope can lead to cost and schedule overruns. So, what is scope creep—and how can you avoid it?

Scope creep the uncontrolled growth of a project's scope. It generally occurs when there is a lack of scope definition and too much leeway given to stakeholders. When this happens, stakeholders begin to add new requirements, often without fully understanding the impact on the project schedule or budget. As a result, scope creep can cause cost and schedule overruns.

Unfortunately, scope creep is all too common in project management. A study by the Project Management Institute found that 43% of projects experience scope creep—and that those projects typically experience a 27% increase in costs and a 20% increase in schedule delays.

So, how can you avoid scope creep? Here are three tips:

  1. Define the project scope upfront. Before you start work on a project, take the time to define what the project entails clearly. What tasks need to be completed? What deliverables will be produced? Who are the stakeholders? Answering these questions upfront will help you keep scope creep at bay.
  2. Set clear expectations with stakeholders. Once you've defined the project scope, ensure stakeholders understand what is and isn't included in the project. This will help prevent them from making unrealistic requests later on.
  3. Get sign-off on changes to the scope. If a stakeholder requests a change to the scope, ensure you get a sign-off from all relevant parties before proceeding with the change. This will ensure that everyone is on the same page and that scope creep doesn't occur.

Scope creep a severe problem in project management, but it doesn't have to be.

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Tags: Startups, Business Continuity, Mental Health

The Power of Incremental Gains
Thinkers360
October 08, 2022

The Power of Incremental Gains

Over the course of our lives, we are faced with countless choices. What we may not realize is that every one of these choices has the potential to lead us down a very different path. Our future selves might be radically different depending on which choice we make today. But how can we possibly know which option is the right one?

The answer is found in the power of incremental gains. As the saying goes, "You get what you repeat." If we want to predict where we'll end up in life, we must follow the curve of tiny gains or small losses and see how our daily choices will compound 10 or 20 years down the line. Let's take a closer look at what this looks like in practice.

The Power of Compounding

To understand the power of incremental gains, we must first understand the concept of compounding. Compounding is an exponential growth process whereby small initial profits are reinvested to generate even bigger returns over time. In other words, it's the snowball effect in action.

For example, let's say you invest $100 at a 10% annual rate of return. After one year, your investment will be worth $110 (10% of $100 = $10). However, if you don't touch that $10 and reinvest it back into your original investment, then next year, your investment will be worth $121 (11% of $110 = $11). And so on. Each year, your investment will grow larger and larger as compound interest takes hold.

Of course, this isn't just limited to investments. The same principle can be applied to any area of life where small, repeated actions lead to significant results over time. For instance, let's say you want to become a better writer. You could set a goal to write 500 words every day; after one year, you would have written 182,500 words (500 x 365 = 182,500). That's enough to write a novel! Or let's say you want to become healthier and set a goal to walk 10,000 steps daily. After one year, you would have walked 3,650 miles (10,000 x 365 = 3,650). That's enough to walk from New York City to Los Angeles!

It's important to note that these examples only scratch the surface regarding illustrating the power of compounding. In reality, the impact is even more significant because as we continue down the road of total gains/losses, our choices become more and more consequential. This is why it's so important to make wise choices early on in life because they have a ripple effect that can last for years—even decades.

When faced with a choice, knowing which path to take can be difficult. However, if we want to predict where we'll end up in life in 10 or 20 years, we have to follow the curve of tiny gains or small losses and let compounding do its magic. Once we understand this principle and harness its power, there's no telling how far we can go!  

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

The Power of Decision Making
Thinkers360
October 05, 2022

The Power of Decision Making

Every action in life begins with a decision. Unfortunately, we don't always make the best ones. James Clear, the author of Atomic Habits, says, "Every action you take is a vote for the person you wish to become." Our decisions shape our lives more than anything else, and often, we're not even aware of the magnitude of their power.

The Science of Decision Making

Scientists have only begun to scratch the surface of understanding how decisions are made. It was once thought that emotions played little to no role in decision-making and that cognitive processes like cost-benefit analysis were carried out dispassionately. However, this view has changed dramatically in recent years. Neuroscientists have discovered that emotion is intimately involved in every decision we make, from what we eat for breakfast to whether or not we get out of bed in the morning.

In one study, participants were asked to choose between two different financial gambles while their brains were being scanned. Scientists found that activity in the amygdala (the part of the brain responsible for processing emotions) predicted whether people would prefer a sure thing or a gamble with higher potential payoffs. In other words, our emotions play a role in even seemingly rational decisions.

It's important to note that not all decisions are created equal. Some decisions are what psychologists call "one-shot decisions," while others are "repeated decisions." One-shot decisions are typically made without much thought because they don't have significant implications and are not likely to be repeated in the future (e.g., what you wear to your friend's birthday party). Repeated decisions are made frequently and have significant consequences (e.g., whether or not to go to college).

While one-shot decisions may seem inconsequential, they can have a cumulative effect on our lives. Every time we make a one-shot decision, we vote for the type of person we want to become. Over time, these votes accumulate and shape our lives in surprising ways. Consider someone who habitually chooses unhealthy foods over healthy ones. They may not think much about it at the time, but each vote adds up and contributes to an unhealthy lifestyle. In contrast, someone who habitually chooses healthy foods is voting for a sustainable long-term lifestyle.

The next time you're facing a decision, big or small, remember the power it has to shape your life. Be mindful of the person you want to become and make choices accordingly. Every vote counts!

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

The Power of Conviction in Leaders
Thinkers360
September 23, 2022

The Power of Conviction in Leaders

We often think of confidence and conviction as two sides of the same coin. However, I believe that there is a big difference between the two. Confidence is based on our ability or perceived ability to do something. Conviction, on the other hand, is based on our belief that we should do something. In other words, confidence is about capability, while conviction is about morality.

I think that conviction is a much more powerful quality for leaders to possess than confidence. This is because conviction gives us the strength to stand up for what we believe in, even when it's not popular or easy. It's easy to be confident when everyone around you agrees with you. It's much harder to be convicted when swimming against the tide.

Unfortunately, I don't often hear about conviction around the board table. I think this is because a conviction can be seen as a weakness. After all, defending a position that you know is unpopular is hard. It's much easier (and safer) to wait for someone else to take the lead. But I believe this is what we need more of in leaders: less confidence and more conviction.

Why? Because conviction gives us moral authority. It allows us to lead by example and inspire others to do the same. When we are convicted about something, we are much more likely to take action and see it through, even when it's tough. This tenacity is infectious and can rally others around us who might otherwise remain passive bystanders.

So how can we develop more conviction? First, we need to take some time to examine our values and beliefs. What do we stand for? What are we willing to fight for? Once we understand our convictions better, we need to be bold enough to voice them—even when it's scary or unpopular. We also need to be prepared to back up our words with action. Only then can we hope to influence those around us positively.

Conviction is a robust quality for leaders because it allows us to stand up for what we believe in—even when it's not popular or easy. If we want to develop more conviction, we must first take time to understand our values and beliefs and be bold enough to voice them authentically. We also need to be prepared back up our convictions with actions. Only then will I have the moral authority required to lead effectively.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

The Power of Emotional Contagion
Thinkers360
September 20, 2022

The Power of Emotional Contagion

Have you ever noticed that when your boss is in a good mood, you tend to be in a good mood too? Or, conversely, when your boss is stressed out and negative, you feel the same way? This phenomenon, known as emotional contagion, occurs when we subconsciously mimic the emotions of those around us. According to research, up to 70% of our feelings are contagious.

Not only does emotional contagion explain why we often feel happy or sad for no reason, but it also has implications for the workplace. A study by The University of Warwick found that when managers are happy, employee happiness increases. When managers are negative, employees become negative. Given the power of your emotions and the impact they can have on those around you, it's increasingly important to gain control of your emotional state.

How to Control Your Emotions

One of the best ways to gain control of your emotions is to practice mindfulness. Mindfulness is being present and aware of the moment without judgment. When you're mindful, you're not living in the past or worrying about the future—you're focused on the here and now.

Mindfulness can reduce stress, improve sleep quality, and boost immune function. It can also help you regulate your emotions by teaching you to observe them without judgment. In other words, mindfulness allows you to step back from your emotions and see them for what they are: fleeting thoughts and feelings that come and go.

If you're struggling to control your emotions, try incorporating mindfulness into your daily routine with these tips:

-Take a few minutes each day to sit quietly and focus on your breath. As thoughts pop into your head, acknowledge them without judgment and then let them go.

-Pay attention to your senses throughout the day. For example, when you're eating breakfast, please take a moment to taste your food and notice its textures and temperature.

-Make a point of talking to people mindfully. Instead of half-listening while scrolling through your phone, give the person your full attention.

Practicing mindfulness will take time and effort, but it's worth it. Not only will it help you better manage your emotions, but it will also improve your overall well-being.

Regulating our emotions is becoming increasingly important in today's fast-paced world. If we want to be successful at work and in our personal lives, we must find ways to control our emotions instead of letting them control us. One of the best ways to do this is through mindfulness—being present and aware in the moment without judgment. By focusing on our breath and paying attention to our senses each day, we can learn to observe our emotions without getting caught up in them. Over time, this practice will help us better manage our emotions at work and at home.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Stop Second-Guessing: How to Master Obeying Your Instincts
Thinkers360
September 19, 2022

Stop Second-Guessing: How to Master Obeying Your Instincts

We've all been there before. You're about to do something, whether speaking up in a meeting or asking someone out on a date, and you chicken out at the last second. Why? Because you start second-guessing yourself. "What if they think I'm stupid?" "What if they laugh at me?" "What if I get rejected?" Second-guessing yourself is normal, but it's also something that you need to learn how to overcome if you want to be successful.

Second-guessing yourself can be detrimental in both your personal and professional life. To succeed, you need to learn to trust your instincts and go with your gut. While it's impossible to know what the future holds, obeying your instinct will more often than not lead you down the right path. Here's why:

1) When you second-guess yourself, you doubt your ability.

2) Second-guessing leads to procrastination, preventing you from taking advantage of opportunities.

3) Obeying your instinct puts you in control of the situation instead of letting your fears dictate your actions.

4) When you trust your gut, you exude confidence that is attractive to potential employers and romantic partners.

5) Going with your instinct allows you to be spontaneous and seize the moment instead of overthinking everything and missing out on good experiences.

Don't let second-guessing yourself hold you back from being successful in both your personal and professional life. Learn to trust your instincts instead of doubting yourself. Obeying your gut will, more often than not, lead you down the right path. When you second-guess yourself, all you're doing is doubting your ability, which can lead to procrastination and missed opportunities. So go out there, be confident, and most importantly, follow your heart!

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Tags: Startups, Business Continuity, Mental Health

The Top 5 Things Leaders Must Be Thinking About
Thinkers360
September 16, 2022

The Top 5 Things Leaders Must Be Thinking About

Leaders have a lot on their plate. They are responsible for making decisions that will affect themselves and the people they lead. Because of this, leaders need to be thoughtful about what they are doing and saying. Here are the top five things leaders must be thinking about.

  1. The Consequences of Their Actions

Before leaders make any decisions, they need to consider their actions' consequences. They need to think about how their choices will affect themselves and the people they lead. Will their decision help or hinder the team? Will it inspire or discourage them? Leaders need to be sure that they are making decisions with the best interests of their group in mind.

  1. What Their Team Needs

Leaders need to be thinking about what their team needs to be successful. Do they have the resources they need? Do they have the knowledge and skills necessary to do their jobs? Are there any obstacles in their way? Leaders must do everything possible to remove the barriers hindering their team's success.

  1. What Motivates Their Team Members

Every person is motivated by different things. As a leader, it is essential to know what motivates your team members so that you can encourage them to do their best work. When you understand what motivates someone, you can give them tasks that play to their strengths and make them feel valued. This will help them be more engaged and productive employees.

  1. How Their Team Is Performing

Leaders need to be constantly evaluating how their team is performing. Are they meeting deadlines? Are they exceeding expectations? Are there any areas where they could improve? By regularly evaluating their team's performance, leaders can identify areas where additional training or support might be necessary.

  1. Their Limitations

Leaders also need to be aware of their limitations. They need to know what they are good at and not good at so they can delegate tasks accordingly. Trying to do everything yourself will only lead to burnout and mistakes. Knowing your limitations will help you create a more effective and efficient team.

As a leader, being thoughtful about what you are doing and saying is essential. It would help if you thought about how your decisions will affect yourself and the people you lead to follow you. Will your decision help or hinder the team?

Leaders can make sound decisions that will move their organizations forward by taking a step back and thinking critically about all of these factors.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Have You Had "The Talk" With Your Team Yet?
Thinkers360
September 08, 2022

Have You Had "The Talk" With Your Team Yet?

If you're a manager or team lead, you've no doubt seen the recent headlines about "quiet quitting." Maybe you've even had a conversation with your direct reports about it. But what if you haven't? Are you curious about what your team may be thinking about it?

What is "Quiet Quitting"?

Quiet quitting is an informal term for reducing the effort one devotes to one’s job, such as by stopping completing any tasks not explicitly stated in the job description. The term implies that this is done secretly or without notifying one’s boss or manager.

Quiet quitting doesn’t actually refer to quitting a job. The term is used in varying ways that refer to different methods of reducing productivity or the amount of work one performs.

“I recently learned about this term called ‘quiet quitting’ where you’re not outright quitting your job, but you’re quitting the idea of going above and beyond,” says Zaiad Khan, a TikTok user with over 10,000 followers, in a soothing voice, juxtaposed with a video of the New York City subway. “You are still performing your duties, but you are no longer subscribing to the hustle culture mentally that work has to be our life.”

The term has been defined and redefined. For some, it is mentally checking out from work. For others, it is about not accepting additional work without additional pay.

If You Haven't Had "The Talk" Yet...

If you haven't had a conversation with your team about quiet quitting yet, now is the time. Ask them if they've ever heard of it, and listen to their concerns. If you can address those concerns head-on, you may be able to prevent someone from actually going through with it.

Your goal should be to create an open and honest workplace where your employees feel like they can come to you with anything—even if it's something as sensitive as this.

Having "the talk" with your team about quiet quitting may not be easy, but it's essential. Creating an open and honest workplace can encourage your employees to come to you with anything—even sensitive topics like this.

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Tags: Startups, Business Continuity, Mental Health

The Power of Intentional Relationships
Thinkers360
September 07, 2022

The Power of Intentional Relationships

We all know that relationships are essential. They can provide support, advice, and laughs when we need them most. They can also be a source of comfort and connection. But we don't often discuss what it takes to cultivate these relationships. The intentionality. The time. The consistency. Being both interesting and interested.

Building solid relationships doesn't happen overnight. It takes work, but it is so worth it. Life is better when you have people in your corner who believe in you and whom you can count on. Here's how you can start building the relationships you want and need.

  1. Set Some Goals

What kind of relationships do you want to build? Do you want more professional connections? More friends? A mentor? A mentee? Once you know what you're looking for, you can start taking steps to make it happen. LinkedIn is a great place to begin expanding your professional network if you're unsure where to start. There are also plenty of Meetup groups for people with similar interests if you're looking for friends with whom to explore your city or town.

  1. Get Out There and Meet People

Now that you know what kind of relationships you want to build, it's time to get out there and start meeting people. Attend events relevant to your field or interests, join groups, and volunteer for committees or boards. You never know whom you'll meet or what opportunities will come your way just by putting yourself out there.

  1. Follow Up

After meeting someone new, follow up within 24-48 hours with a note or email thanking them for their time and letting them know you enjoyed speaking with them. If they gave you their business card, reference something specific from your conversation, so they know you were listening. This is also an excellent time to invite them to coffee or lunch so you can continue the conversation in a less formal setting.

4.* Nurture Your Relationships *

The key to any relationship is nurturing it over time so it can grow and thrive. Check-in with your connections regularly through social media, text, email, or in person. Have thoughtful conversations, offer help when needed, and make an effort to keep the relationship balanced, so it doesn't become one-sided. When both parties feel like they are getting something out of the relationship – whether it's advice, laughter, or simply someone to listen –it starts to shine.

Relationships are essential – there's no doubt about that – but what's often missing from the conversation is how much work goes into cultivating them. It takes time, energy, and effort to build strong relationships with the people in our lives, but it is worth it when we do. The power of positive relationships should never be underestimated. The fact is, the relationships we have with the people around us have a significant impact on our happiness and productivity. So if you want to be happier and more productive at work (and in life), make an effort to cultivate positive relationships with the people around you. It will make all the difference.

 

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

The Importance of Vision in Change
Thinkers360
September 06, 2022

The Importance of Vision in Change

What role does vision play in organizational change? Scholars and practitioners have debated this question for many years. There are three different perspectives on this question. First, we ask if vision is a driver of change or if vision emerges through the change process. Second, we ask whether vision helps or hinders change. Third, we assess whether the vision is better attributed to heroic, charismatic leaders or is better understood as an organizational attribute.

Vision as a Driver of Change

One perspective on the role of vision in organizational change is that it is a driver of change. This means that without a clear and compelling vision, change is unlikely to occur. Herb Kelleher, the co-founder of Southwest Airlines, is often cited as an example of a leader who used vision to drive change. According to Kelleher, "A good visionary leader stirs the emotions by appealing to what ought to be rather than what has been" (Kelleher, 1996, p. 4). In other words, leaders who can articulate a compelling vision of what could be are more likely to drive change successfully.

However, not everyone agrees that vision is a driver of change. Some scholars argue that vision emerges through the change process. For example, John Kotter's influential work on leading organizational change argues that "visionary companies" are those that "set their sights far into the future and develop achievable plans for realizing their aspirations" (Kotter & Heskett, 1992, p. 9). Kotter argues that vision is not something that leaders develop in isolation; instead, it emerges from the process of leading change.

Vision Helping or Hindering Change?

Another debate surrounding the role of vision in organizational change concerns whether vision helps or hinders change. On the one hand, it could be argued that vision helps change by providing direction and focus. Vision can help organizations to set priorities and mobilize resources toward achieving their goals. On the other hand, some scholars have argued that visions can hinder change by creating rigidity and inflexibility. Organizations with solid visions may be reluctant to deviate from their original plan even when it becomes clear that doing so would be beneficial.

Heroic or Organizational Attribute?

Finally, there is debate regarding whether visions are better attributed to heroic leaders or whether they are better understood as an organizational attributes. On the one hand, it could be argued that visions are primarily the product of courageous leaders who possess extraordinary qualities such as charisma and creativity. These leaders can create a shared sense of purpose and direction that inspires employees to achieve great things. On the other hand, some scholars have argued that visions are best understood as an organizational attribute because they are created and shared by groups of people rather than individual leaders (Thompson & McHugh, 2009).

There continues to be much debate surrounding the role of vision in organizational change. However, regardless of where you stand on these debates, there is no doubt that vision plays a vital role in shaping how organizations evolve. Whether you believe that vision is a driver of change or something that emerges through the process of leading change; whether you think vision helps or hinders change; or whether you attribute vision primarily to heroic leaders or see it as something best understood as an organizational attribute—these are all critical questions worthy of continued exploration!

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

A Brief History of Labor Day
Thinkers360
September 05, 2022

A Brief History of Labor Day

Though we often think of Labor Day as simply a day off work, it actually has a rich history dating back to the late 19th century. Here's a brief overview of how this federal holiday came to be.

The origins of Labor Day can be traced back to 1882, when machinist Matthew Maguire proposed the creation of a holiday to celebrate workers at a meeting of the Central Labor Union in New York City. The idea took hold, and on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, 10,000 workers took unpaid time off to march from City Hall to Union Square in support of the concept. The success of that parade led to similar celebrations across the country in the following years.

In 1884, the first Monday in September was selected as the date for future Labor Day celebrations, and on June 28 of that year, then-President Grover Cleveland signed a bill making it an official federal holiday. (Interestingly enough, Cleveland actually vetoed an earlier version of the bill because he believed that creating a new holiday during an economic downturn would be inappropriate.)

Though its exact origins are unclear, one popular theory about how Labor Day came to be is that it was created as a way to diffuse tension between workers and employers following the Pullman Strike of 1894. That strike began when workers at the Pullman Palace Car Company in Chicago went on strike to protest wage cuts and poor working conditions. The strike quickly spread across the country, causing widespread disruption to rail traffic. After several workers were killed during confrontations with troops called in to break up the strike, Cleveland declared September 5—the first Monday in September—to be a federal holiday in an attempt to restore calm.

Labor Day may have started as a way to honor America's workers, but these days it's also seen as the unofficial end of summer. Whether you're heading out for one last weekend getaway or firing up the grill for a final backyard barbecue, we hope you have a happy and safe Labor Day!

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Are You Ready to Be a Leader? 4 Questions to Ask Yourself
Thinkers360
September 05, 2022

Are You Ready to Be a Leader? 4 Questions to Ask Yourself


If you're reading this, chances are you're considering taking on a leadership role. Congratulations! This is an exciting (and sometimes daunting) prospect. Ask yourself these four questions to help you decide if you're truly ready for the challenge.


1. Do you have the necessary experience?
There's no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, as the required experience will vary depending on the company, team, and role you're considering. However, having a good foundation in the area you'll be leading is essential. For example, if you're being considered for a C-suite position, you'll need more extensive experience than being considered for a management position. Alternatively, if you're considering starting your own business, your entrepreneurial experience will be more critical than your corporate experience.


2. Do you have the support of your team?
A good leader doesn't go it alone; they collaborate with their team and get buy-in from team members before making decisions. If you're not confident that your team will support your leadership, it may be best to wait until you've earned their trust.


3. Do people naturally follow your lead?
This quality is difficult to quantify, but it's essential nonetheless. Take some time to reflect on previous leadership experiences (both formal and informal) and ask yourself if people naturally followed your lead or if you had to work hard to get people on board.


4. Are you ready to make tough decisions?
As a leader, you'll often face difficult choices and far-reaching consequences. If the thought of making these decisions stresses you out, leading may not be the right path for you—at least not yet.


Deciding whether or not to take on a leadership role is a big decision that should not be taken lightly. By asking yourself these four questions, you can better understand whether or not you're ready for the challenge. And remember, even if you don't feel completely prepared now, that doesn't mean you never will be; leaders are made, not born. With perseverance and practice, anyone can develop the skills to lead effectively.

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Tags: Startups, Business Continuity, Mental Health

Become The Workplace Diplomat
Thinkers360
September 03, 2022

The role of the diplomat has evolved considerably over the centuries. In ancient times, diplomats were often sent on long journeys to establish trading relationships or deliver messages between rulers. The most famous example is perhaps the Greek messenger Pheidippides, who is said to have run over twenty miles to bring news of a victory at the Battle of Marathon. Since the beginning of recorded history, there have been those who have acted as intermediaries between different groups. In ancient times, these Diplomats were often religious or political leaders, chosen for their ability to resolve conflict and build relationships. As international trade increased and travel became more common, the need for experienced diplomats grew. By the early 1700s, the role of a diplomat had become formalized, with different countries sending envoys to represent their interests abroad. Today, diplomacy remains an essential part of maintaining peace and stability around the world. Experienced diplomats are still vital in resolving conflicts and promoting understanding between different cultures.

Throughout history, many great diplomats have worked to promote peace and understanding between nations. While each diplomat has had their unique style, some traits have been shared among many of the most successful. Great diplomats have typically been very articulate and able to communicate their views. They have also been skilled at finding common ground and compromise, even when the two sides seem far apart. Additionally, they have usually been patient and persistent, willing to continue working towards a resolution even when progress seems slow. Finally, many great diplomats have also been very knowledgeable about the cultures and histories of the countries they are dealing with, allowing them to build trust and credibility. While not all diplomats possess all these qualities, those who do are often the most successful in promoting peace and understanding.

In ancient Greece, the Athenian diplomat Thucydides was instrumental in negotiating peace between Athens and Sparta. During the Middle Ages, Francesco Petrarca served as a diplomat for the Pope, helping to secure papal states in Italy. In more recent times, Woodrow Wilson was a crucial figure in the foreign policy of the United States, and his work helped to establish the League of Nations. These are just a few examples of the many diplomats who have played a vital role in history.

In the workplace, diplomats are the ones who can see both sides of every issue and come up with creative solutions that satisfy everyone. They’re the ones who can keep a cool head under pressure and calmly diffuse tense situations. In other words, they’re the ones who always seem to know exactly what to say (and when to say it).

So how do you become the workplace diplomat? First, it’s important to remember that there is rarely just one “right” answer to any given problem. Instead of jumping to conclusions, take the time to think about all of the different perspectives involved. Once you understand the issue better, you can start working on finding a compromise that everyone can live with. And finally, don’t forget the power of communication. When you can communicate your thoughts and feelings effectively, finding common ground with others is much easier.

If you want to be successful in the workplace (or in life), learning how to be a diplomat is essential. It may not always be easy, but it’s worth the effort.

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Tags: Startups, Business Continuity, Mental Health

Better Than Fine
Thinkers360
August 28, 2022

We settle for mediocrity far too often. We convince ourselves that it's better to be safe than sorry, that it's not worth risks, and that we're happy with just getting by. But what does that really mean for our lives? Are we truly content with living in a world where we settle for just being fine? I think we can all do better than that. We can aspire to feel great, be our best selves, and make a difference in the world. When we're constantly striving for excellence, we open new doors and opportunities that we never would have thought possible. So don't settle for feeling just okay. Push yourself to do better and to feel greater than fine. You might be surprised at what you're capable of achieving.

In life, we are often faced with choices. To stay safe or to take a risk. To stay in our comfort zone or to venture out into the unknown. It can be difficult to take risks, especially when we don't know what the outcome will be. But sometimes, taking a risk is the only way to get something extraordinary. When we stay in our comfort zone, we limit ourselves. We miss out on new experiences and opportunities. We may never know what could have been if we had just taken that first step. But when we take a risk, even if it doesn't turn out the way we wanted, we learn and grow from the experience. We become more confident and learn to trust our instincts. So next time you're faced with a choice, don't be afraid to take a risk. You just might end up with something extraordinary.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Why Leaders Need To Keep Their Eyes On True North
Thinkers360
August 25, 2022

The phrase "true north" is often used to describe someone's innermost values or convictions. However, the phrase actually has its roots in navigation. In the days before GPS, navigators relied on a variety of tools to help them find their way. One of the most important of these was the compass. A compass needle always points towards magnetic north, but this is not the same as true north. Magnetic north is constantly shifting, so it's not a reliable guide for long-distance travel. True north, on the other hand, is unchanging and can be used to plot a course that will never stray off course. Over time, the phrase "true north" came to be used as a metaphor for anything that provides an unwavering sense of direction.

A group of researchers from Harvard Business School recently released a study on what they call the "true north." According to the study, this term refers to a leader's core values and beliefs. The researchers found that leaders who are clear about their true north are more likely to be successful in setting strategy and priorities. They also found that these leaders are better at dealing with difficult situations and making tough decisions.

Interestingly, the researchers found that many leaders are not aware of their true north. This can lead to them making decisions that are not in line with their core values. As a result, they may end up pursuing goals that are not necessarily important to them. The good news is that the researchers say that it is never too late for leaders to discover their true north. By doing so, they can improve their chances of success both in business and in life.

How do you find your true north? For some people, it's a lifelong quest. For others, it's something that they figure out early on in life. But what is true north, exactly? And how can it help you achieve success in your life and career?

True north is often described as your personal compass, guiding you toward your most authentic self. It's about aligning your actions with your values and beliefs. When you're clear about your true north, making decisions becomes easier because you know what you stand for and what you're aiming for in life.

Having a strong sense of true north can also help you stay focused and motivated when things get tough. If you know what you believe in and what you're trying to achieve, it's easier to keep going even when the going gets tough. Additionally, research has shown that people who have a strong sense of true north are more likely to persevere in the face of setbacks and achieve their goals.

So how do you find your true north? It's different for everyone, but there are a few key questions that can help guide the way: What are your core values? What do you believe in? What are you striving for? Once you have a good understanding of these things, you'll be well on your way to finding your true north.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Master the Pivot
Thinkers360
August 24, 2022

Changing the direction of a company is no small feat. It requires careful planning and execution to be successful. There are four key steps that must be taken to pivot a company's strategy: 1) Define the problem that you are trying to solve. What is the new opportunity that you are trying to capitalize on? 2) Assess your resources and capabilities. Do you have the necessary skills and experience to pursue this new opportunity? 3) Develop a clear value proposition. What is it that you can offer that is unique and valuable? 4) Create a plan for how you will execute the pivot. What needs to be done to make this change? By taking these steps, you can increase the chances of success when changing the direction of your company.

In business, a pivot is a change in strategy made in response to new information or circumstances. A successful pivot can mean the difference between success and failure, and there are many examples of companies that have used pivots to great effect. One well-known example is Netflix, which started out as a DVD-by-mail service before pivoting to streaming video. This was a response to the growing popularity of broadband internet and the declining popularity of DVDs. Another example is Nokia, which was once the world's leading manufacturer of mobile phones. However, when smartphones became popular, Nokia was slow to respond, and as a result, it lost market share to competitors such as Apple and Samsung. Nokia eventually made a successful pivot to focus on selling smartphones running on the Android operating system. These are just two examples of successful pivots in strategy. As businesses increasingly operate in dynamic and ever-changing environments, the ability to pivot quickly and effectively will become increasingly important.

Pivoting is a challenge for leaders for several reasons. First, leaders are often reluctant to abandon their original vision for the company, even if it is no longer feasible. This can lead to resistance from other members of the team who may be more open to change. Additionally, leaders are often emotionally attached to their original plan and may have difficulty letting go of it to pursue a new direction. Finally, pivoting requires leaders to make difficult decisions quickly and with limited information. This can be a daunting task, especially when the stakes are high. For all these reasons, pivoting is a challenge for leaders but one that can ultimately lead to success if done correctly.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

What is Success
Thinkers360
August 21, 2022

What is success in life? This is a question that has been asked throughout history, and there is no one answer that is universally agreed upon. For some people, success might mean achieving financial stability or becoming famous. For others, it could simply mean living a happy and fulfilling life. In the end, success is a personal definition that varies from person to person.

There are many different paths that can lead to success in life. Some people achieve success through hard work and determination, while others may have more natural talent or advantages. Regardless of the path taken, there are certain commonalities that often lead to successful outcomes. For example, successful people typically set goals and work towards them tirelessly. They also surround themselves with positive people who support and encourage them. Additionally, they are usually lifelong learners who are constantly expanding their knowledge and skills.

While there is no single definition of success, there are certain qualities and attributes that tend to lead to successful outcomes. By setting goals and working hard towards them, surrounding yourself with positive people, and continuously learning, you increase your chances of achieving success in life.

People often mistakenly believe that success is something that can be achieved all at once. However, the truth is that success is seldom simultaneous. More often, it is something that must be achieved through a series of steps, or one thing at a time. For example, if someone is hoping to start their own business, they will need to take many different actions in order to make their dream a reality. They will need to come up with a business plan, raise capital, find the right location, and hire employees. Trying to do all of these things at once would be overwhelming and is likely to lead to failure. However, taking them one step at a time will increase the chances of success.

For example, consider the case of George Washington. Born into a family of modest means, he had little chance of becoming wealthy or famous. However, he was determined to make something of himself, and so he set out to become a surveyor. This required years of hard work and dedication, but eventually he became one of the most respected surveyors in Virginia. From there, he went on to serve in the military, and later became the first president of the United States. As this example shows, success often comes as the result of taking things one step at a time. So if you are looking to achieve something in your own life, don't be discouraged if it takes time. Remember that Rome wasn't built in a day, and neither are most lasting accomplishments.

Another example of success achieved through taking small steps is that of J.K. Rowling, the author of the Harry Potter series. When she was struggling to make ends meet as a single mother, she began writing the first book in what would become one of the most successful franchises in history. However, she didn't simply sit down and write the entire book at once. Instead, she wrote a little bit each day, gradually completing the manuscript over the course of several years. By taking this approach, she not only finished her book, but also went on to achieve monumental success.

This principle applies to other areas of life, such as personal relationships and professional development. It is important to remember that success seldom comes all at once. Instead, it is usually the result of taking one thing at a time.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Be A Truth Seeker
Thinkers360
August 20, 2022

In our fast-paced, ever-connected world, it's more important than ever to be able to spot a lie. Whether we're trying to protect ourselves from being scammed or simply wanting to avoid being misled, the ability to see through deception can save us a lot of trouble. However, with all the practice we get at catching lies, it's easy to become jaded and assume that everyone is out to deceive us. While it's important to be cautious, this cynicism can prevent us from building trust with others. If we want to go the extra mile, we need to move from lie spotting to truth seeking. Instead of assuming that everyone is lying to us, we should ask questions and try to understand their perspective. Only then can we hope to build trust and relationships that are based on mutual respect and understanding.

There are many historical examples of people who have sought out the truth, even in the face of opposition. One famous example is Galileo Galilei, who was a scientist in the 1600s. He argued that the earth revolves around the sun, which was contrary to the Church's beliefs at the time. Galileo was put on trial and spent the rest of his life under house arrest. However, his work laid the foundation for further scientific discoveries, and his legacy is still celebrated today.

Other examples of truth seekers include Mahatma Gandhi and Nelson Mandela. Both men fought for civil rights in their respective countries, despite facing immense opposition. They both spent time in prison, but their efforts ultimately led to positive change. Their stories serve as an inspiration to people all over the world who are fighting for justice.

Truth seeking can be a difficult and dangerous endeavor, but it is also essential for progress.

New research suggests that it may be better for our mental health to simply focus on seeking the truth, rather than trying to spot lies.

The study found that people who were focused on lie spotting were more likely to experience anxiety and mistrust. In addition, they were less likely to feel confident in their abilities and more likely to second-guess themselves. On the other hand, those who were focused on truth seeking were more likely to feel positive and optimistic. They were also more likely to trust their gut instincts and feel confident in their abilities. So, next time you're not sure whether someone is being truthful or not, try to focus on seeking the truth. It just might be better for your mental health in the long run.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

The Engaged Conversationalist
Thinkers360
August 19, 2022

It's often said that the most dangerous people are those who have never had a conversation. In other words, they've only ever talked to themselves. And while that may seem like an exaggeration, there's definitely some truth to it. A leader who has only ever had conversations in their own mind is a very dangerous thing. A leader with too many inner monologues is a recipe for disaster. They're not used to hearing other points of view, and they're not used to being challenged. As a result, they're more likely to make decisions that are based on their own personal biases and judgments. They're also more likely to be impulsive and reactionary, rather than calm and rational. Instead of becoming lost in their own thoughts, leaders need to foster a culture of open communication and dialogue. Only then can they truly understand the needs of their followers and make the best decisions for everyone involved. In short, a leader who has only ever had conversations in their own mind is a ticking time bomb.

When Rosalind Brewer became the CEO of Starbucks in 2017, she knew that she had her work cut out for her. The coffee giant was struggling to regain its footing after a series of PR disasters, and Brewer was determined to turn things around. Part of her strategy was to visit each Starbucks location and talk with employees and customers. This gave her a chance to get a better understanding of the company's strengths and weaknesses. It also allowed her to build relationships with the people who were most important to Starbucks' success. So, over the course of her first year on the job, Brewer made it a priority to visit every Starbucks location around the world. In addition to meeting with employees and customers, Brewer used these visits to get a better sense of how each store was run and what could be improved. Thanks to this hands-on approach, Brewer was able to quickly identify areas where Starbucks needed to make changes, such as streamlining its operations and increasing its focus on customer service. As a result of her efforts, Starbucks is now in a stronger position than ever before.

In today's business world, the ability to communicate effectively is essential for success. However, many people confuse communication with conversation. While both involve the exchange of information, communication is about transmitting a message, while conversation is about exchange of ideas. This is an important distinction, because leaders need to be able to do both. Leaders must get out of their heads, out of the office and be an engaged conversationalist. This is the most important point I can make. You can have all the title in the organization, but if you're not engaged with people, you will fail. Leaders need to have conversations with people, not just about task and deadlines. They need to find out what's going on with them, what's important to them and what they're thinking about. To do this effectively, leaders need to get out from behind their desks and talk to people face-to-face. They need to be accessible and approachable, so that people feel comfortable talking to them. Only then will they be able to gain the trust and respect of those they lead.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

History of Kindness
Thinkers360
August 18, 2022

From ancient times to the present day, acts of kindness have been celebrated in cultures around the world. In some cultures, kindness is seen as a virtue to be cultivated, while in others it is considered an innate quality. In both cases, however, kindness is often associated with positive outcomes such as happiness, health, and prosocial behavior.

Historically, acts of kindness have been documented in religious texts, literature, and folklore. The Bible, for example, includes stories of kind characters such as the Good Samaritan and Jesus Christ himself. In the Islamic tradition, the Prophet Muhammad is said to have advised his followers to "be kind to your parents." In Buddhist teachings, compassion is one of the four core virtues. And in Confucianism, filial piety—the act of respecting and caring for one's parents—is considered one of the most important moral principles.

Throughout history, then, acts of kindness have been revered as essential components of moral character. Today, scientific research is beginning to reveal the benefits of kindness on individual well-being. Studies have shown that kind people are more likely to experience positive emotions such as joy and pleasure. They are also less likely to experience negative emotions such as anger and anxiety. In addition, acts of kindness have been linked with physical health benefits such as lower blood pressure and reduced stress levels. Ultimately, then, the centuries-old tradition of celebrating kindness appears to be justified by science.

There's no doubt that we live in a fast-paced, stressful world. With ever-growing To Do lists and increasing demands at work and home, it's easy to get caught up in the hustle and bustle and forget about being kind. But maybe, just maybe, we're seeing a shift. A call for more kindness in the workplace and in life in general.

Sure, there will always be competition and stressors that can lead to negative behaviors like gossiping or backstabbing. But hopefully, as we become more aware of the importance of mental health and well-being, we'll also start to see more acts of kindness. Small things like holding the door open for someone, offering a compliment or lending a listening ear can make a big difference. And when we're kind to others, we often find that they are kind back.

So let's hope that this trend towards more kindness continues. Because kindness makes us happier, healthier and more productive. It's good for business and it's good for the soul.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

I Love Having My Brain Picked
Thinkers360
August 17, 2022

The phrase "pick your brain" is often used to describe the process of asking someone for advice or input on a particular topic. However, the origins of this phrase are somewhat unclear. One theory is that it dates back to the late 1800s, when doctors would literally remove pieces of a patient's brain in order to study it. This practice was known as "brain picking," and it was seen as a way to gain insights into the workings of the mind. However, another theory suggests that the phrase is actually a metaphor that originated in the early 1900s. At that time, business deals were often finalized by two parties "picking each other's brains" in order to come to an agreement. Regardless of its origins, the phrase "pick your brain" is now commonly used to describe the act of seeking advice from someone who is knowledgeable about a particular subject.

When it comes to finding a mentor, there are a few common mistakes that people tend to make. One is assuming that the most successful person in their field would be the best mentor. However, this isn't always the case. A mentor should be someone who is willing to take the time to invest in your development, and who has the patience to offer constructive feedback. Another mistake is failing to communicate what you're looking for in a mentor relationship. It's important to be clear about your goals, so that you can find someone who is a good fit for you. Finally, don't be afraid to ask for help. A mentor is there to support you, and you shouldn't hesitate to reach out if you need guidance. By avoid these common mistakes, you can set yourself up for a successful mentorship experience.

I love having my brain picked. I love being asked how, what and why I've done what I've done. It's so flattering to think that someone is interested in my thoughts and opinions. And it's also a great opportunity to share my knowledge and insights. I always feel so energized after a good brain picking session. It's like my brain has been given a workout, and it's just what I need to keep my mind sharp. So, if you're ever in the mood for a good brain picking session, count me in! I'm always game.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

The Business Continuity Dos and Don’ts
Thinkers360
August 15, 2022

As a business leader, you know that any time your business is disrupted, it can cost you time and money. That's why it's so important to have a plan in place to help you stay up and running during an emergency. But what exactly should you do to prepare for the unexpected? Here are some dos and don'ts to keep in mind:

DO have a plan. A good business continuity plan will help you protect your employees, customers, and bottom line. Make sure your plan includes steps for relocating your business, communicating with stakeholders, and keeping critical systems up and running.

DON'T wait until an emergency strikes to start preparing. By the time a disaster hits, it's too late to put a plan in place. Start working on your business continuity strategy now, so you're ready to act quickly if an emergency does occur.

DO test your plan regularly. A well-tested plan is more likely to be successful when it's actually needed. Schedule regular drills and test everyone on their roles and responsibilities. That way, everyone will know what to do in the event of an actual emergency.

DON'T forget about mobile workers. If some of your employees work remotely, make sure they're included in your continuity plan. That way, they'll know what to do if they can't come into the office or if they need to evacuate their homes.

DO involve your employees. Your employees are a critical part of your business, so they need to be involved in the continuity planning process. Make sure they understand the potential risks and how the plan will work. They should also know who to contact if an emergency does occur.

DON'T forget about your suppliers and partners. If your suppliers or partners are unable to continue operating during an emergency, it could disrupt your business as well. Talk to them about their own continuity plans and make sure you have alternate suppliers lined up in case of an interruption in service.

By following these simple dos and don'ts, you can help ensure that your business is prepared for anything that comes its way.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Is Trust Having an Existential Crisis in the Workplace?
Thinkers360
August 09, 2022

I was just listening to a conversation between Marshall Goldsmith, the #1 leadership coach, and Stephen Covey, author of Speed of Trust. They were discussing the idea that trust may be having an "existential crisis" in the workplace. It was a really interesting conversation that got me thinking about the role of trust in our lives and how we can create more trust in our relationships.

Goldsmith and Covey noted that trust is essential for effective leadership and teamwork. Without trust, people are less likely to collaborate or communicate openly. As a result, mistrust can lead to conflict and division. The two experts also pointed out that trust is often broken when people feel like they are being taken advantage of or treated unfairly. When this happens, it can be difficult to regain trust.

Covey suggested that one way to create more trust in the workplace is to focus on "speed of trust." This means creating an environment where people feel safe to take risks, make mistakes, and learn from their mistakes. When people feel like they can trust their colleagues and leaders, they are more likely to be open and honest, which creates a more productive and cohesive workplace.

Goldsmith and Covey's conversation was a timely reminder of the importance of trust in our lives. It's clear that trust is essential for effective leadership and teamwork, but it's also fragile. We need to be careful not to break the trust that we have with others. And we need to create an environment where people feel safe to take risks, make mistakes, and learn from their mistakes. Only then can we hope to create more trusting relationships in our lives.

In human interactions, it's often wise to API - that is, to assume positive intent. What this means is that, even if someone does something that seems odd or suspicious at first, you give them the benefit of the doubt and assume that they're just trying to help or that there's a perfectly good explanation for their actions. Oftentimes, we jump to conclusions without all the information, and by assuming negative intent we can quickly break down relationships. However, if we give people the benefit of the doubt, we're more likely to find solutions and build bridges instead of walls. By assuming they have good intentions, you may be more likely to trust them, and they may feel more inclined to trust you in return. This can be a difficult mind-set to maintain, especially in today's climate of suspicion and mistrust. However, if you can manage it, API will often result in improved relationships and better outcomes. In the business world, for instance, mistrust can quickly lead to costly delays and lawsuits. But if employees are able to assume positive intent, they can often avoid these problems and find creative solutions that benefit everyone involved. In our personal lives, too, API can make a world of difference. Family disputes, for example, are often caused by a failure to assume positive intent. If we can remember that our loved ones are acting out of love and not malice, we can often find a way to resolve disagreements without lasting damage to our relationship.

So next time you're feeling suspicious or angry about someone's actions, try to take a step back and assume positive intent. It just might make all the difference in the world.

 

 

 

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

So Tired
Thinkers360
August 04, 2022

You've been staring at your computer screen for what feels like hours, but you still can't seem to get started on that project. Sound familiar? If you're finding it difficult to focus at work, you're not alone. In today's fast-paced world, it can be hard to stay on task. However, if you're constantly struggling to focus, it could be a sign that your work isn't the right fit for you. Here are four signs that your focus is holding you back at work:

  1. You're always distracted. If you find yourself constantly daydreaming or getting sidetracked by social media, it may be a sign that your work isn't engaging enough for you. A lack of interest can make it difficult to focus on even the simplest tasks.
  2. You're always tired. Feeling exhausted can make it hard to concentrate. If you find yourself nodding off at your desk or struggling to keep your eyes open, it may be a sign that your job is taking a toll on your energy levels.
  3. You're always stressed. Stress can also impact your ability to focus. If you're constantly worrying about deadlines or feeling overwhelmed by your workload, it may be time to reassess your workload and see if there's anything you can delegate or eliminate.
  4. You're not meeting your goals. If you find yourself consistently missing deadlines or falling short of your goals, it may be time to reassess whether your current position is the right fit for you. If you're not challenging yourself or growing in your role, it could be time to move on.

If you're finding it difficult to focus at work, it could be a sign that something isn't quite right. By paying attention to these four signs, you can start to identify the root of the problem and make the necessary changes to get back on track.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

The Value of a Self-Aware Leader
Thinkers360
July 28, 2022

Have you ever looked through a microscope for the first time? It's amazing, isn't it? You see all these things that you never knew existed, right there in front of you the whole time. It's similar to the blind spots we have as leaders. We can be so focused on what we're doing that we don't realize what's happening right under our noses. But if we take the time to step back and really look at our organizations, we'll start to see the areas where we need to make changes. We'll see the problems that need to be fixed and the opportunities that we're missing out on.

The idea of a blind spot is brilliantly illustrated in the wonderful New Yorker cartoon. To the  clowns, being a clown is normal. Therefore, a portrait of a corporate executive who is lacking makeup, a red ball for a nose, and a bald wig seems unnatural, ‘expressionless,’ and disturbing!  The man is so eerily…. featureless!

These are four blind spots I see in today’s leaders.

#1 Locked-in thinking in terms of one’s own leadership approach

As a leader, it's important to always be learning and evolving your style as you gain more experience. One trap that many leaders fall into is "locked-in thinking" where they get stuck in the leadership approach they formed in their 20's and don't adapt as they grow older and gain more experience. This can limit your effectiveness as a leader and make it difficult to relate to and connect with people who have different perspectives. It's important to be aware of this trap so that you can avoid it and continue to develop your leadership skills over time.

#2 Confirmation seeking

Leaders often seek confirmation from their subordinates because they only receive filtered information. In an environment where one is a senior leader, there are often very few people who speak up and straight to you. Therefore, one starts to get a filtered view of the world. This can be detrimental because it leads to confirmation bias, which is when people only seek out information that confirms their preexisting beliefs. This can make leaders close-minded and resistant to new ideas. It's important for leaders to be aware of this bias and make an effort to seek out divergent perspectives. This can be done by talking to people outside of their immediate circle, encouraging dissent, and being open to criticism. By doing this, leaders can avoid making decisions based on confirmation bias and instead make informed decisions that are in the best interest of their organization.

#3 Locked-in thinking in terms of own organization and market

In business, it's important to be able to think outside the box. But sometimes, organizations can get too comfortable with their own way of doing things, and they can become reluctant to change. This is known as "locked-in thinking." Locked-in thinking can lead to missed opportunities and a failure to adapt to new market conditions. It can also prevent organizations from seeing the potential in new technologies or new approaches. To avoid locked-in thinking, it's important to encourage open-mindedness and creativity within an organization. Encouraging employees to challenge assumptions and think differently can help to break down this type of thinking. It's also important to encourage customers and other stakeholders to give feedback, as this can give organizations a fresh perspective. By being open to new ideas, organizations can avoid becoming locked into outdated ways of doing things.

 

 #4 Remote image

In today's business world, more and more communication is happening remotely, through email, phone, and web meetings. But while this might be the new norm, it can also create a blind spot for leaders who are unaware of their remote image.

When we communicate remotely, we can't rely on body language or other nonverbal cues to convey our message. This can make it easy to come across as abrupt or even rude, when that's not our intention. And since email is often seen as a permanent record, any missteps in our remote communication can have lasting consequences.

That's why it's so important for leaders to be aware of their remote image, and to take steps to ensure that they're conveying the right message when they're communicating remotely. One way to do this is to make sure that your written communication is clear, concise, and polite. Another is to pay attention to your tone of voice when you're speaking on the phone or in a web meeting. By being conscious of your remote image, you can avoid misunderstandings and build better relationships with your colleagues, clients, and customers.

Everyone has blind spots - areas where we are clueless, make consistent mistakes or have biases that get in the way of our success. But when you have a leadership position, blind spots can be especially dangerous. That's because there are two factors at play: 1) you probably will have more and new blind spots because of your leadership position; 2) because of your position, people are less likely to make you aware. In other words, as a leader, it's easy to fall into a trap of thinking you know everything and that your judgement is always correct. This can lead to serious consequences for yourself and your team. That's why an active investment in analyzing one's own leadership blind spots is key. By taking the time to reflect on your own behavior and decision-making, you can identify areas where you need to improve. This self-awareness will help you make better decisions, avoid costly mistakes, and become a more effective leader.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Independence Day
Thinkers360
July 04, 2022

For many people in the United States, the Fourth of July is a time to celebrate the country's independence. Here are three reasons why this holiday is so important:

First, the Fourth of July is a reminder of the principles on which the United States was founded. These principles include freedom, democracy, and equal rights for all. The Fourth of July is a chance to celebrate these values and to recommit to upholding them.

Second, the Fourth of July is a time to remember and honor the sacrifices made by those who have fought for the country's freedom. From the Revolutionary War to present day, brave men and women have given their lives for America. The Fourth of July is a day to thank them for their service.

Finally, the Fourth of July is simply a great opportunity to come together with family and friends, enjoy some good food and fun, and appreciate all that it means to be an American. No matter what your background or beliefs, there is something special about being able to celebrate Independence Day with your fellow citizens.

So whether you're waving a flag, grilling some burgers, or watching fireworks, take a moment on July 4th to reflect on what makes America great.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Just In Time
Thinkers360
June 30, 2022

Maybe it's the satisfaction of knowing we worked right up until the last minute and still got the job done. Or maybe it's the rush of adrenaline that comes with completing something just under the wire. Whatever the reason, it seems that many of us crave the feeling of finishing a project just in time. Perhaps it stems from our time in school, when essays were due at the end of the period and projects were always due on Friday afternoon. Whatever the case may be, there's no denying that there's a certain appeal to finishing things at the last minute. Of course, it's not always ideal, and sometimes it can lead to subpar work. But there's just something about that sense of accomplishment that comes with completing a task at the eleventh hour.

People who procrastinate are often thought of as lazy or disorganized. But according to Anna Abramowski, a British psychologist who studied the construct of procrastination at Cambridge University, there may be another explanation. Abramowski argues that people who "actively procrastinate" display a certain level of self-reliance, autonomy and self-confidence. Active procrastinators are aware of the risks of waiting until the last minute, but they make the conscious decision to do so anyway. This type of behavior is often seen in creative fields, where individuals need to generate new ideas and solutions. In these cases, procrastination can actually be beneficial, as it can lead to more creative thinking. So the next time you find yourself putting off a task, think of it as an opportunity to be more innovative.

Many people find themselves struggling with procrastination at some point in their lives. While there is no one definitive cause of procrastination, there are a few suggested explanations. One theory is that it can be traced back to a strict upbringing, in which children learn that putting things off till the last minute is unacceptable. As they grow older, they may rebel against this by continuing to procrastinate. Another possibility is that procrastination is simply an inherited personality trait. Some people are naturally more laid back and less inclined to plan ahead, while others are more Type-A and thrive on meeting deadlines. Finally, it's also possible that procrastination stems from a fear of failure or even success. If someone is afraid of not being perfect, they may put off starting a project altogether, lest they have to confront their own shortcomings. Whatever the cause, procrastination is a common phenomenon that can be difficult to overcome.

We've all been there: we've taken on too much, over-committed ourselves, and then had to drop the ball somewhere. It's frustrating, and can feel like we're never going to get ahead. But it turns out, there's a reason we do this - it's called the planning fallacy. The planning fallacy is a cognitive bias that leads us to underestimate the time it will take to complete a task. We do this for all sorts of things, from personal projects to work deadlines. And while it might seem like we're just being optimistic, the reality is that this bias can lead us to overcommit to opportunities and then not be able to deliver on them. The next time you're considering taking on a new project, try to account for the planning fallacy. It might mean that you need to give yourself a little extra time.

With all this it's no secret that we humans love a good adrenaline rush. Whether it's skydiving, bungee jumping, or even just watching a horror movie, we crave the feeling of being on the edge of our seats. And according to some experts, this love of thrills is hardwired into our brains. In fact, it may even be what drives much of human achievement. After all, if we weren't constantly pushing ourselves to the limit, would we ever really progress? It's a pretty incredible thing when you think about it: the same instinct that propel us towards excitement and adventure is also what drives us to achieve great things. So the next time you're feeling the need for a little thrill, remember that you're in good company. We may be creatures of habit, but we're also creatures of innovation. And that's something to be celebrated.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Why is fairness such a powerful motivator?
Thinkers360
June 29, 2022

The psychological phenomenon of "it's not fair" is pretty interesting. Essentially, it's the human tendency to compare our own circumstances to others' and feel resentment when we perceive that someone else has it better than we do. This feeling of unfairness can be triggered by all sorts of things, from noticing that a coworker got a raise while we didn't, to seeing a friend post about their luxurious vacation on social media. And while the sentiment of "it's not fair" might seem trivial or petty, it can actually cause a lot of psychological distress. In some cases, it can even lead to depression or anxiety. So why do we feel this way? Well, scientists believe that it's evolutionary. In our hunter-gatherer days, feeling envy towards someone who had more food or resources than us meant that we were more likely to compete for those resources and improve our own chances of survival. While that instinct might not be as useful today, it's still hardwired into our brains.

What does this phrase actually mean? And why do we say it? One psychological explanation for "it's not fair" is that we have a fundamental need for fairness. We want to believe that the world is just and that people get what they deserve. When we see someone who doesn't seem to be playing by the rules, it bothers us. It goes against our sense of what is right and proper.

Another explanation is that we use "it's not fair" as a way of coping with feeling envy or jealousy. When we see someone who has something we want, it can trigger negative emotions. Saying "it's not fair" allows us to distance ourselves from those feelings and makes us feel better.

We all have those times at work when everything seems to be going wrong. The deadlines are looming, the workload is mounting, and our colleagues seem to be more interested in playing politics than actually getting the job done. In times like these, it's easy to feel like the world is against us. We might even start to feel like it's not fair.

But what does it mean when we say something is "not fair?" And more importantly, what role does justice play in our experience of work-related stress?

Recent research has shed some light on these questions. In a study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, investigators examined the relationship between workplace stressors and job performance. They found that employees who perceived their work environment as being unjust were more likely to experience stress-related decreases in job performance. Importantly, though, this relationship was mediated by perceptions of leader support. In other words, employees who didn't feel supported by their leaders were more likely to see their work environment as being unfair – and this, in turn, was associated with poorer job performance.

Another study found that employees who experienced procedural justice – that is, who felt that their work environment was fair and just – were more likely to report higher job satisfaction and commitment, as well as better performance.

Interestingly, the study also found that leaders play a role in how employees perceive justice in the workplace. In particular, employees who felt supported by their leaders were more likely to perceive procedural justice, even when there were actual incidences of unfair treatment. This suggests that leaders play an important role in setting the tone for how employees experience justice – or lack thereof – in the workplace.

A new paper in the Journal for Business Ethics has suggested that a rethink might be required when it comes to leadership and change. The research, which was conducted with 100 French companies, showed that there is a strong correlation between those leaders who are able to inspire change and those with a reputation for fairness. The study's authors say that this finding " challenges the widely held belief that transactional leadership, focused on results at any cost, is the most effective way to lead in times of crisis and change." They go on to suggest that " inspirational leaders who are perceived as fair are more likely to be effective in mobilizing employees to achieve results in times of crisis and change."

Fairness is such a powerful motivator because it reveals how a person values us. When we are treated fairly, it shows that the other person sees us as equals. This is in contrast to being treated unfairly, which suggests that the other person believes they are better than us or that our opinions and rights don't matter. Treatment of this sort can be very demotivating, as it makes us feel devalued and unimportant. By contrast, fairness makes us feel valued and respected, motivating us to reciprocate these feelings. It's no wonder, then, that fairness is such an important part of our social interactions.

When it comes to motivation, people often think of things like money or recognition. However, there's one motivator that's even more powerful than these things: fairness. Fairness is so important because it reinforces our sense of justice. We all want to live in a world where people are treated fairly, and when we see unfairness, it can really upset us. That's why companies that are known for being fair to their employees tend to be more successful. Employees who feel like they're being treated fairly are more likely to be happy and productive. So if you're looking to create a motivated workforce, make sure you're promoting fairness.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Critical Thinking: The Key to Success in Any Field
Thinkers360
June 27, 2022

You’ve surely heard of critical thinking, but you might not be entirely sure what it really means. For the most part, we think of critical thinking as the process of analyzing facts in order to form a judgment. Basically, it’s thinking about thinking. However, there are many different ways to define critical thinking. Some people see it as a way to solve problems, while others see it as a way to think creatively. Regardless of how you define it, critical thinking is an important skill to have in today’s world. With so much information available at our fingertips, it’s important to be able to sift through the facts and find the information that’s most relevant to you. And that’s where critical thinking comes in. By learning to think critically, you’ll be better equipped to make decisions, solve problems, and think creatively

In today's world, it's easier than ever to find information on just about any topic. With a few clicks of a button, you can have access to articles, videos, and even experts who can provide you with information on just about anything you could want to know. However, this ease of access to information has also created a bit of a problem. It's now possible for people to mimic intellectual accomplishment by indulging in an illusion of expertise provided by a limitless supply of facts. As author Tom Nichols writes, "The Web has become, for many people, an evidence-free zone where pre-existing beliefs are confirmed rather than challenged and intellectual curiosity is a fatal flaw." This isn't to say that there's no value in having easy access to information. But it's important to be aware of the danger of using this information as a crutch instead of engaging in critical thinking. Otherwise, we run the risk of losing sight of what it truly means to be knowledgeable.

Critical thinking is important to the workplace for a number of reasons. First, some professions simply require it. For example, in the medical field, precise decisions need to be made quickly and often, and critical thinking is essential for making sure those decisions are sound. Second, even in professions that don't require critical thinking, it can still be enormously helpful; employees who engage in critical thinking tend to make better decisions, resulting in a more efficient and effective workplace. Third, critical thinkers tend to be happier than their non-critical counterparts; they're more engaged with their work and have a greater sense of control over their lives. Fourth, being well-informed is always a bonus, and critical thinking encourages employees to seek out knowledge and understanding. Finally, it bolsters the knowledge economy by encouraging employees to reflect on their own skills and expertise and continuously learn new things. In short, there are many good reasons to encourage critical thinking in the workplace.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

What Elite Performers Teach Us About Succeeding in Life and Business
Thinkers360
June 24, 2022

Elite athletes are often lauded for their physical prowess and mental toughness. They are able to push themselves to perform at an extraordinarily high level, both physically and mentally. Whether they’re winning gold medals or taking their team to the championships, elite athletes find ways to push their bodies and minds beyond what the rest of us are capable of. In many cases, it is their competitive nature that drives them to succeed. They are always looking for ways to improve their performance, whether it is through training, diet, or mental preparation. While the rest of us might be content with simply meeting our goals, elite athletes are always striving to reach new levels of excellence. As a result, they are often able to achieve things that we never thought possible.

As any elite athlete knows, success is seldom achieved without years of hard work and dedication. But what separates the best from the rest? What enables them to push past the pain and fatigue to reach the top of their game?

Recent studies have shed some light on this question, revealing that there are certain habits and mindset that distinguish elite athletes from those who fall short. And while not everyone can be an Olympic gold medalist, these 3 lessons from the world's best athletes can help you attain any objective you set your mind to:

  1. Establish a clear goal and commit to it: Elite athletes know exactly what they want to achieve and have total committed to achieving it. They don't allow anything or anyone to stand in their way.
  2. Believe in yourself: Self-doubt is one of the biggest obstacles to success. Elite athletes have learned to silence their inner critics and believe in themselves, even when the odds are stacked against them.
  3. Focus on the process, not the outcome: It's easy to get caught up in results and forget about the journey. But elite athletes know that it's the journey that counts, not the destination. They focus on putting in the work.

Top-tier leaders are extremely disciplined in their thinking and actions. They take full ownership of their words and deeds, and they are decisive in their decision-making. They have an extreme clarity of thought and purpose, and they exude an air of trustworthiness. These four critical disciplines are the cornerstone of effective leadership, and elite leaders exemplify them to an extreme degree. When you interact with a top-tier leader, you can sense their commitment to these disciplines. They inspire confidence and instill trust. You may not reach the level of Elite Leaders, but you will undoubtedly see improvement in your leadership skills.

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Tags: Startups, Business Continuity, Mental Health

When To Make Your Move
Thinkers360
June 23, 2022

In almost every area of life, timing is everything. This is especially true in sports, where a split-second decision can mean the difference between winning and losing. Those who can read the signs and act at the right moment often reap the rewards.

The Law of Timing is all about understanding when to make your move. This ability is also critical leadership skill. Timing is everything in life, and that definitely applies to leadership. Knowing when to take action and when to hold back can mean the difference between success and failure. As John Maxwell observed, "the wrong action at the wrong time can lead to disaster." Similarly, the right action at the wrong time can bring resistance. On the other hand, acting at the right time with the right action is a recipe for success. Timing really matters in our leadership practice, and it is a fine art. Being able to read the situation and act accordingly is a keyway to demonstrate strong leadership skills.

One of the ways effective leaders show timeliness is by being able to see opportunities and risks before others do. This ability allows them to get ahead of potential problems and capitalize on opportunities as they arise. They are also able to take a broader view and see the big picture more clearly than others. This enables them to make strategic decisions that will have a positive impact on their company or organization.

Effective leaders also know how to seize the moment. They are not afraid of change or taking risks. They are always looking for ways to improve and make things better. And they are willing to be radical, when necessary, to achieve their goals. By being timely and decisive, effective leaders can create lasting change and achieve great things.

Proper timing requires a few things in order to be successful. It is important to understand the reasons behind why you are doing something. This helps to set realistic expectations and also allows you to learn from your mistakes in the future. Furthermore, maturity is key in achieving proper timing. Making sure that your motives are pure and in line with your goals will prevent you from getting sidetracked. In addition, being confident and decisive are essential qualities to have when trying to achieve proper timing. Knowing what needs to be done and having the guts to take action is imperative. Lastly, experience is a valuable asset. Learning from your past experiences, both good and bad, will help you immensely in achieving proper timing.

Timing is everything in life, and it’s especially important when it comes to business. With the right timing, you can achieve your goals with substantially less effort and much lower risk, so, it’s definitely worth taking timing into consideration and calculating it into your strategy.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

The Law of the Inner Circle - Don't Go Alone
Thinkers360
June 21, 2022

The people closest to us have a huge impact on our ability to lead effectively. The Law of the Inner Circle states that the people in our innermost circle will determine our potential as leaders. It is essential that the members of our inner circle are people who have our best interests at heart, want to see us succeed, and are able to hold us accountable. Our inner circle should be comprised of people with complementary skills who are closely connected to each other. This way, we can maximize our own strengths and utilize the strengths of others to achieve great things. Mother Teresa provides a perfect example of the power of the inner circle when she said, “You can do what I can’t do. I can do what you can’t do. Together we can do great things.” By surround herself with people who shared her vision and complemented her skills, Mother Teresa was able to change the world. We, too, can use the Law of the Inner Circle to reach our full potential as leaders.

The notion that you become like the five people you spend the most time with is not a new one. In fact, Darren Hardy cites research by Harvard social psychologist Dr. David McClelland which suggests that the people with whom you habitually associate determine up to 95 percent of your success or failure in life. The idea is that, over time, you will adopt the beliefs and behavior patterns of those around you. If you associate primarily with successful, positive people, then it stands to reason that you will yourself be more successful and positive. Conversely, if you surround yourself with negative people who are always complaining, it's likely that you will adopt a similar attitude. This is why it's so important to be mindful of the company you keep. If you want to achieve success in any area of life, it's essential to associate with people who have already achieved what you want to achieve. By doing so, you will put yourself on the fast track to success.

This quote is often attributed to Abraham Lincoln, though it is uncertain if he actually said it. Regardless of its origin, the sentiment expressed in the quote is sound. When undertaking any task, it is important to invest in the tools that will be used to complete the task. This is particularly true when the task is challenging. For example, if you are planning to chop down a tree, you will need a sharp ax. If you spend the majority of your time sharpening the ax, you will be able to chop down the tree more quickly and with less effort. The same principle can be applied to any goal. If you take the time to invest in the right tools, you will be able to achieve your goals more efficiently and with greater success. We often forget the people in our lives when it comes to investing in them and their impact on us.

In my life, I am surrounded by different types of people who each offer their own unique perspective. The Achievers in my life teach me the importance of taking urgent action and not wasting time. While their sense of urgency is often helpful, I also need to be careful not to bowl over other people in my haste. The Empaths in my life remind me to always consider the needs of others. Their gentle nudges help me to be more compassionate and understanding, but I also need to be careful not to make things more difficult than they need to be. The Optimists in my life show me the importance of always seeing the silver lining. While their optimism is refreshing, I also need to be careful not to underestimate the difficulties that I may face. The Wooers in my life teach me the importance of building and maintaining relationships. While their reminders are often helpful, I also need to be careful not to talk too much and listen too little. Lastly, the Commanders in my life teach me the importance of making decisions quickly. While their decisiveness is often helpful, I also need to be careful not to expect people to perform at their best in areas where they are weak. Each of these types of people brings something valuable into my life, and I am grateful for all that they teach me.

When it comes to your professional journey, remember that you don’t have to go it alone. Working with a team of supportive colleagues can help propel you further and faster than if you tried to make it on your own. So, find your tribe and work together to achieve success.

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Tags: Startups, Business Continuity, Mental Health

Clunky Companies Produce Ambivalent Leaders
Thinkers360
June 20, 2022

As any runner knows, there are good days and bad days. Some days you feel like you can run forever, while other days every step is a struggle. For a running coach, sluggishness in a runner is a sign that something isn't right. It could be anything from a lack of sleep to an injury, but whatever the cause, it's important to find out what's causing the ambivalence and lack of confidence. Otherwise, the runner is at risk of quitting altogether. The same is true of organizations. When leaders become tired and lose heart, the whole organization can become sluggish.

As organization theorist Samuel Bacharach once said, there are only two reasons why organizations become sluggish: they're either clunky or myopic. To break it down a little further, an organization is clunky if it's inefficient - meaning, it takes too many resources to get things done. This could be because the company is using outdated technology, or because its processes are needlessly complicated. On the other hand, an organization is myopic if it's short-sighted - meaning, it's not focused on the future. Instead, it's fixated on the present, and as a result, it doesn't invest in long-term growth. Of course, most organizations are a little bit of both - they're clunky and myopic to some degree. The key is to find the right balance between efficiency and innovation. If an organization can do that, then it stands a chance of surviving and thriving in today's ever-changing landscape.

I've always believed that the key to sustaining momentum in any organization is finding the right balance between tight and loose control. On one hand, you need to have enough centralized control to ensure that everyone is moving in the same direction and that things are getting done efficiently. On the other hand, you need to have enough looseness in the system to allow for creativity and innovation. Too much of either one can be detrimental. Organizations like Walmart are known for their tight centralized control, and organizations like Zappos are known for their extremely loose, free-wheeling system of management. I think the best leaders are those who are able to strike a balance between the two extremes.

Just as a running coach needs to find the root of the problem to help a runner, leaders need to find the source of their organization’s sluggishness. Once the cause is identified, it can be addressed and hopefully resolved.

Signs of sluggishness can be difficult to identify and even harder to address, but they should not be ignored. If your organization is suffering from any of the symptoms of sluggishness, don't wait until it's too late. Address the issue head-on and take steps to revive your company culture.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Hope Is A Funny Thing
Thinkers360
June 13, 2022

Hope is a funny thing. It's one of those intangible assets that's hard to define, but you know it when you feel it. And when things are tough, hope can be a powerful tool. Hope can give us the strength to keep going when we want to give up. It can help us find solutions when we feel stuck. And it can give us the courage to take risks and seize opportunities. In difficult times, hope is precious capital. Employees who feel hopeful and optimistic are more creative, agile, and resilient. They're better able to adapt to change and overcome challenges.

When things are tough, it can be tempting to give up hope. After all, what’s the point of hoping for something when the odds seem stacked against you? Leading with hope can be challenging at the best of times, but during an economic downturn it can feel downright impossible. Hope feels like a luxury when people are losing their jobs and struggling to make ends meet. But hope is precisely what we need during tough times like these. Hope is not a denial of reality. It’s not blindly optimistic or unrealistic. Rather, it’s the belief that even in the darkest of times, there is a chance for light and happiness. It’s the strength to keep going even when everything seems hopeless. And it’s an essential part of leading effectively. As Nelson Mandela said, “Let your hopes, not your fears, shape how you lead.” In other words, don’t let the difficult realities of a situation cause you to lose sight of what you are fighting for.

Gallup Organization studied the fears, concerns, and confidence of citizens from across the world through many of the biggest crises of the past 80 years — including the Great Depression, Pearl Harbor, and World War II, Kennedy's assassination, civil unrest in the 1960s, 9/11, the 2008 financial crash, and now, the COVID-19 pandemic. They found people’s level of confidence generally decreases during times of crisis. This is understandable, as when the world is in turmoil, it can be hard to feel like anything is certain. However, Gallup’s studies have also shown that there are some people who maintain their confidence despite the chaos around them. These “Bold Thinkers” are able to see opportunity where others see only obstacles. They are not afraid to take risks, and they are confident in their ability to overcome challenges.

It's easy to feel like things will never get better when the present is so tough, but it's important to remember that hardships are only temporary. Things will eventually improve, and in the meantime, we need to do our best to lead with hope. Hope is a powerful thing - it can inspire people to keep going even when things are tough. So let's all try to be a little bit more hopeful, even in these challenging times. Who knows? Maybe our positive attitude will help turn things around sooner than we think.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Entrepreneurship, Mental Health

The Power of Good Judgement
Thinkers360
June 12, 2022

Anyone who has ever been in a position of leadership knows that judgment is a vital quality. The ability to make sound decisions, based on knowledge and experience, is what separates good leaders from great ones. In their book Judgment: How Winning Leaders Make Great Calls, Noel Tichy and Warren Bennis, argue that judgment is the most important attribute of exemplary leadership. They argue that leaders must be able to make decisions quickly and confidently, even in the face of uncertainty. While some people are naturally gifted with strong judgment, Tichy and Bennis argue that it is a quality that can be developed through experience and self-reflection. With the right training and mindset, anyone can learn to make great decisions—the cornerstone of successful leadership.

A lot of experts have tried to define good judgment, but it's still hard to understand exactly what it is or how to acquire it. Some say it's an acquired instinct or "gut feeling" that lets you combine deep experience with analytic skills at an unconscious level. This combination lets you see things that others overlook. While this makes sense, it's hard to put into practice. Good judgment is something that comes with experience. The more you have, the better your judgment becomes. But how do you know if you have good judgment? One way is to ask people who know you well and who have seen you make decisions in different situations. They can give you their opinion on whether they think you have good judgment or not. Another way is to look at your track record. If you've made a lot of bad decisions, then chances are your judgment isn't very good. But if you've generally made good decisions, then your judgment is probably pretty good. There's no sure way to tell, but these are some ways that can help give you an idea.

Leaders with good judgment tend to be good listeners and readers. They're able to take in large amounts of information and distill it down to the key points. This allows them to make better decisions, both in the short and long term. Good listeners also tend to be better at building relationships. They're able to understand where others are coming from and find common ground. This is essential for effective leadership. Leaders with good judgment are often lifelong learners. They're always looking for new ideas and perspectives that can help them improve their decision-making skills. If you want to be a successful leader, start by honing your listening and reading skills. These will serve you well in all aspects of your life.

It's always been hard for leaders to make judgement calls - after all, they're responsible for the lives of others and the well-being of society as a whole. But in recent years, it seems like the task has become even harder. The pandemic has forced leaders to make decisions with life-or-death consequences, and the political divide has made it difficult to find consensus on even the most basic issues. As a result, judgement calls have become more difficult than ever for leaders. How can they know if they're making the right decision when there is so much uncertainty? It's a daunting task, but one that leaders must face every day. Hopefully, with time and experience, they'll be able to find a way to make judgement calls that are best for everyone involved.

Good judgment is something that everyone hopes for in their leaders. When good decisions are made, it's a sign that the leader is thinking about what's best for the group as a whole and not just themselves. This usually results in a positive outcome for everyone involved. Seeing leaders use good judgment can be inspiring and give hope that things will continue to go well. It's a reminder that the world is full of capable people who are working hard to make it a better place. So, the next time you see a leader making good decisions, take a moment to appreciate all the good they're doing.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Entrepreneurship, Mental Health

Respect in the 21st Century: What it Means and Why it's Important
Thinkers360
June 09, 2022

The concept of respect has been around for centuries. In fact, the Ancient Greeks had a word for it – arete. Arete encompassed the idea of excellence and reaching one’s full potential. The Romans also had a similar concept, which they called virtus. For the Romans, virtus was about being honorable and virtuous.

Over time, the meaning of respect has evolved. Today, we tend to think of respect as a sign of admiration or esteem. We might respect someone because of their achievements or their position in society. Or we might simply respect someone because they’re kind and goodhearted.

In many cultures, respect is closely intertwined with the concept of leadership. In order to be respected by others, a leader must first show respect for those they are leading. This mutual respect creates a strong bond between leader and followers, and helps to create a sense of unity within a group. Respect is also often seen as a sign of strength, both in oneself and in others. A person who is able to command respect is seen as someone who is capable and confident, two qualities that are highly valued in leaders. Respect is an essential part of what it means to be a leader, and its importance has been recognized throughout history.

Leaders in the 21st century face a unique challenge when it comes to respect. In an age of instant communication and 24-hour news cycles, it can be difficult to maintain the respect of those who you lead. In addition, the increased emphasis on individual rights and personal autonomy means that people are less likely to defer to authority figures. As a result, leaders must work hard to earn the respect of their followers. One way to do this is by showing respect for the opinions and ideas of others. Additionally, leaders should strive to create an environment where everyone feels valued and respected. By creating a culture of respect, leaders can encourage their followers to do the same.

If you want people to respect you, it's important that you be someone worthy of their respect. People tend to follow those who they see as strong leaders--someone with skills and traits that are beyond their own. So if you want others to look up to you and be willing to follow your lead, aim to be the type of person that possesses characteristics they would admire and respect. It's not accidental who we choose to follow--we're more likely to gravitate towards those we see as having something to offer that we ourselves lack.

Whatever your definition of respect may be, there’s no doubt that it’s an important part of our lives. It helps us to build positive relationships, to communicate effectively, and to resolve conflicts peacefully. In short, respect is essential for creating a harmonious and thriving society.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Entrepreneurship, Mental Health

Prevention Not Intervention
Thinkers360
June 07, 2022

If there’s one thing all parents can agree on, it’s wanting to see your child succeed in life. Unfortunately, life comes with challenges, and many of these challenges can take a toll on your child’s physical and mental health. Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are a type of negative event that can have lasting effects on a child’s health and well-being. ACEs can include things like family turmoil, emotional distress, and exposure to violence. Each time a child faces an ACE, it increases their risk for health problems later in life. An adverse experience doesn’t guarantee a future problem, rather, it heightens a child’s future risk of mental health problems, injury, risky behaviors, infectious or chronic disease and lack of income or educational opportunities. Most notably, as it relates to this topic, ACEs can increase the risk of depression, anxiety, suicide and PTSD. The CDC estimates as many as 21 million cases of depression could have been potentially avoided by shielding children from these adverse experiences.

According to a study by the University of Michigan, 80% of parents report being "very satisfied" with their parenting skills. However, only 60% of those same parents feel "very engaged" in their child's life. The study found that the majority of parents who are not engaged in their child's life cite a lack of time or energy as the primary reason. Parents love their kids but tend to not put in the effort to be actively engaged in their lives. By doing this, they prevent themselves from becoming true wellsprings of knowledge for their children.

If you're a parent, then you know that there's no manual to raising a self-reliant child with high self-esteem. You want your child to listen, respect and trust you, but it's not always easy to achieve those goals. Research tells us that the most effective way to raise a self-reliant child is to be authoritative rather than authoritarian. It's important to be consistent, firm and loving as your child grows and develops. The challenges will change, but your approach should remain the same.

By being an engaged parent, who is consistent and loving, you can prevent a lot of the avoidable sadness that your child will experience in their lifetime. 80% of avoidable sadness, to be exact. It's a daunting statistic, but one that you can make a dent in simply by being more engaged with your child's life.

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Tags: Health and Safety, Health and Wellness, Mental Health

Leaders Need To Stop Winning So Much
Thinkers360
June 02, 2022

In his book, "What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful", my friend Marshall Goldsmith explores the idea that many qualities that contribute to success early on in a person's career can become obstacles to further success later on. For example, a driven and competitive personality may help someone to achieve initial success but can alienate others and create an uncooperative work environment. In order to continue growing and achieving, successful people need to be aware of these potential pitfalls and learn to adapt their behavior accordingly.

Peter Drucker famously said, "We spend a lot of time helping leaders learn what to do. We do not spend enough time teaching leaders what to stop."

 In the book Marshall discusses the 20 bad habits of leaders. Marshall said, “Everyone I have met has exhibited one or more of these behaviors, including me!”

Do you identify with any of these bad habits? If you are like the majority of people, the answer is yes, and you are ready to start using “What to Stop.”

  1. Winning too much: The need to win at all costs and in all situations.
  2. Adding too much value: The overwhelming desire to add our two cents to every discussion.
  3. Passing judgment: The need to rate others and impose our standards on them.
  4. Making destructive comments: The needless sarcasm and cutting remarks that we think make us witty.
  5. Starting with “No,” “But,” or “However”: The overuse of these negative qualifiers which secretly say to everyone “I’m right and you’re wrong.”
  6. Telling the world how smart we are: The need to show people we’re smarter than they think we are.
  7. Speaking when angry: Using emotional volatility as a management tool.
  8. Negativity, or “Let me explain why that won’t work”: The need to share our negative thoughts even when we weren’t asked.
  9. Withholding information: The refusal to share information in order to maintain an advantage over others.
  10. Failing to give proper recognition: The inability to give praise and reward.
  11. Claiming credit that that we don’t deserve: The most annoying way to overestimate our contributions to any success.
  12. Making excuses: The need to reposition our annoying behavior as a permanent fixture so people excuse us for it.
  13. Clinging to the past: The need to deflect blame away from ourselves and onto events and people from our past; a subset of blaming everyone else.
  14. Playing favorites: Failing to see that we are treating someone unfairly.
  15. Refusing to express regret: The inability to take responsibility for our actions, admit we’re wrong, or recognize how our actions affect others.
  16. Not listening: The most passive-aggressive form of disrespect for colleagues.
  17. Failing to express gratitude: The most basic form of bad manners.
  18. Punishing the messenger: The misguided need to attack the innocent who are usually only trying to help us.
  19. Passing the buck: The need to blame everyone but ourselves.
  20. An excessive need to be “me”: Exalting our faults as virtues simply because they’re who we are.

 

Marshall went on to say, “For those who still aren’t sure what to stop, there is one habit that I’ve seen take precedence over all of the others. You may be part of the majority of people who partake of this bad habit. What is the number one problem of the successful executives I’ve coached over the years? It is Winning Too Much.”

Marshall provides numerous examples of successful people who have made this transition and offers practical advice for doing so. This book is an essential read for anyone looking to take their career to the next level.

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Tags: Business Strategy, Business Continuity, Mental Health

The Benefits of Not Remembering
Thinkers360
May 31, 2022

Though we often think of forgetting as a failure of the brain, new research suggests that forgetting may actually be a functional feature. According to this theory, forgetting allows the brain to interact dynamically with the environment, discarding information that is no longer useful and making room for new experiences. This theory may help to explain why we often forget details such as names and faces, but can still remember our essential life story. While forgetting may be essential for the brain to function properly, it can also be a problem for leaders who need to remember important facts and figures.

Scott A. Small, a professor of neurology and psychiatry at Columbia University and author of the 2021 book Forgetting: The Benefits of Not Remembering. “The fundamental insight—the eureka, I think, of the new science of forgetting—is that our neurons are endowed with a completely separate set of mechanisms … that are dedicated to active forgetting.”

We’ve known for a while that forgetting is essential to learning; it allows us to consolidate new memories and store them more efficiently. But the mechanisms underlying this process were mysterious. Now, thanks to cutting-edge research, we’re beginning to understand how forgetting happens at the level of individual neurons—and why it might be just as important as remembering.

“If you want to remember something for the long term, a good strategy is to forget it for a little while,” Small says. “It sounds counterintuitive, but it turns out that forgetting is essential for memory consolidation.”

When we first learn something, it is encoded in what scientists call “working memory.” This is a kind of temporary storage system that allows us to keep information in mind for a limited period of time—just long enough to use it. But working memory is fragile, and the information it contains is quickly forgotten unless we do something to move it into longer-term storage.

Our memories are vital to our lives, allowing us to recall past experiences and learn from them. But what is the evolutionary purpose of memory? According to Sheena Josselyn, a senior scientist at the Hospital for Sick Children and a professor of psychology and physiology at the University of Toronto, the purpose of memory is not simply to allow us to reminisce about the past. Instead, it is primarily a tool for helping us make decisions in the present. Our memories provide us with important information that can help us avoid dangerous situations, choose the best mates, and find the most productive hunting grounds. In other words, our memories are essential for helping us survive and thrive. Without them, we would be at a severe disadvantage in the battle for survival.

In today's fast-paced business world, it is more important than ever for leaders to find effective ways to remember key information. By understanding how forgetting works, leaders can take steps to ensure that they remember what is most important.

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Tags: Entrepreneurship, Mental Health, Startups

It's Tough At The Top
Thinkers360
May 30, 2022

In recent years, society has begun to challenge its long-held associations between mental health and weakness. This shift in attitude is evident in the increasing amount of research being conducted on mental health, the de-stigmatization of conditions like anxiety and depression, and the overall willingness to talk about these issues openly. However, when it comes to the C-Suite, discussing emotional wellbeing openly is still a touchy subject. This reluctance is likely due to the high-pressure nature of executive positions, where any sign of weakness can be perceived as a liability. As a result, many business leaders are hesitant to seek help for fear of being seen as unable to handle the demands of their job. Additionally, there is a sense that admitting to struggles with mental health may be used against them by shareholders or board members. While society has made progress in its understanding of mental health, there is still much work to be done in normalizing these conversations in the workplace. Until then, executives will continue to suffer in silence.

A study conducted by global health insurer Bupa found that 58% of senior business leaders find it difficult to open up about mental health. Leaders who were dealing with mental health conditions felt that talking about it would affect their current role, the perception of their capabilities, and their future career. The study also found that 61% of leaders said they had experienced poor mental health in the past 12 months. This is a significant increase from the 43% who said the same in 2018. It's clear that more needs to be done to support leaders who are dealing with mental health issues.

The age-old phrase of ‘it’s tough at the top’ will ring true for many leaders. At CEO-level, it can be hard to find someone to talk to or share the burden with. According to a study by Mental Health America, 49% of CEOs report struggling from a mental health condition and the majority of CEOs say that they are feeling overworked, struggling with fatigue and suffering from continual stress. The demands of the job can often be overwhelming, and it can be difficult to maintain a work-life balance. However, it is important for CEOs to find ways to cope with the stress of the job and to take care of their mental health.

Leaders should feel comfortable talking about their mental health without fearing for their careers. Only then will we see real progress being made.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Mental Health, Startups

Health-Oriented Leadership
Thinkers360
May 28, 2022

According to CBInsights' State of Mental Health Tech 2021 Report, mental health technology funding soared last year, with companies bringing in $5.5 billion globally across 324 deals. That amounts to a 139% climb from 2020, when startups scooped up $2.3 billion across 258 deals. A surge of interest in mental wellness services during the pandemic has created new opportunities for businesses. The report found that the pandemic has been a major driver of growth in the mental health tech industry, with investors pouring billions of dollars into startups offering everything from online therapy to workplace wellness programs. And it's not just big tech companies that are getting in on the action: a number of insurance companies and healthcare providers are also launching their own mental health offerings.

In the past, we used to only worry about physical health and safety. Now, thankfully, we're moving towards a time when people are starting to understand that good mental health is also important. Every workplace on the planet involves people. And when you put people together in one place, the mix of personalities, money, priorities, and pressure can start to cause tension. Good mental health is important for everyone. Leaders have a lot of responsibility. Not only are they responsible for their own mental and emotional wellbeing, but they're also responsible for the wellbeing of their team. And, of course, they're also responsible for achieving results that investors are happy with. It can be a lot to juggle, and it's no wonder that so many leaders struggle with mental health issues. Leaders play an important role in safeguarding the mental health of people in the workplace. Leaders control the flow of work and set the goals and expectations. As a result, they have a direct impact on the stress levels of those they manage.

The good news is that there are things leaders can do to mindfulness of mental health for their team. One of the most important things is to create a culture where it's okay to talk about mental health. This means normalizing the conversation and creating an environment where people feel safe to speak up about their struggles. It also means being open about your own mental health journey and setting the example for others. When leaders are mindful of their own mental health, it sets the tone for the rest of the team. Leaders who can strike the balance between promoting mental health and achieving results will be more successful in the long run.

Mental health is often viewed as something different from physical health, but in reality, they are very closely linked. Just as our physical health can suffer from poor diet and lack of exercise, our mental health can be adversely affected by stress, anxiety, and other negative emotions. And just as we take steps to maintain our physical health, we should also make an effort to care for our mental wellbeing. When we do so, we not only improve our own lives, but we also create a more positive environment for those around us. By addressing mental health as we do physical health, we can all benefit.

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Tags: Startups, Business Continuity, Mental Health

The History of Leadership: How it has Evolved over Time
Thinkers360
May 26, 2022

It seems that throughout history, the most influential leaders have generally belonged to one of three categories: political, military, or religious. Political leaders, like Hammurabi in Babylon around 1790 B.C., have unified their empires through codified laws that treat all people fairly and equally. Military leaders, such as Sun Tzu in China from 500 B.C., have focused on wise political policies and strategies to prevent war, rather than using armies as a last resort. And religious leaders have had the greatest impact of all, shaping the beliefs and values of entire societies. From Buddha and Confucius in Asia to Jesus Christ in Europe and the Americas, religious leaders have left an indelible mark on the world. For example, Jesus Christ lived over 2,000 years ago, but his teachings are still followed by millions of Christians today. Similarly, Buddha's teachings have been followed by billions of Buddhists for over 2,500 years. In contrast, the average lifespan of a political leader is less than 10 years, and the average lifespan of a military leader is even shorter. It is clear that throughout history, the most influential leaders have been those who could appeal to the heads, hearts, and souls of their followers.

The one constant throughout the history of leadership is change. Over time, leaders have had to adapt their styles and methods to fit the needs of the people they represent. The industrial revolution brought about a new type of leader, one who could motivate workers in factories to achieve higher levels of productivity. In the 20th century, political leaders like Gandhi and Churchill emerged, who were able to inspire their citizens to fight for independence and freedom. And today, we are seeing a new generation of leaders emerge who are using technology to connect with people all over the world.

Anyone who has spent time in the workforce in the last twenty years has likely noticed a shift in the way that leadership is approached. Gone are the days of the autocratic leader who runs the show with an iron fist, barking out orders and expecting unquestioning obedience. In today's workplace, the most successful leaders are those who know how to work collaboratively, bringing out the best in their team members through open communication and a shared sense of purpose. This shift away from autocracy towards collaboration has helped to increase productivity, innovation and creativity, as team members feel more invested in their work and are better able to capitalize on their strengths. As the world of work continues to evolve, it is clear that collaborative leadership will continue to be key to success.

21st century leadership is a multidimensional and integrative view of leadership that seems to be based in relationships. Through shared purposes and aspirations, leadership brings forward new ways of being, knowing, and doing, while respecting the developmental nature of the human life. 21st century leadership is oriented toward being inclusive, collaborative, and of service, to individuals, the social good, and ecological sustainability.

Who will be the next great leader of our time? Only time will tell. But one thing is certain: the history of leadership is a long and varied one, full of examples of what works and what doesn't. As we move into the future, it's important that we learn from the past and continue to evolve the way we lead. Only then can we hope to meet the challenges of the 21st century and beyond.

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Tags: Entrepreneurship, Mental Health, Startups

No Shortage of Stressors
Thinkers360
May 25, 2022

It's been a tough year, and it seems like there's been one mass shooting after another. Yesterday's tragedy in Texas was the 199th mass shooting of the year, and it's only May. Between the pandemic, economic uncertainty, and racial and political unrest, there's been no shortage of stressors. And, unfortunately, the number of mass shootings in the U.S. this year has only added to the disturbing events for Americans. Experts say that all of this is taking a toll on employees' mental health and that company and HR leaders should check in on their workers and encourage them to prioritize their mental wellbeing during times of crisis and turmoil. It's important to remember that we're all in this together and that we'll get through it by supporting each other. Carolina Valencia, vice president in the Gartner HR practice, says that business leaders need to remember that employees are people, not just workers. She says that it's an organization's duty to support its employees as best they can while they try and cope with crises like the mass shootings we have witnessed this year.

In these uncertain times, it's more important than ever for employers to support their workers. With so much anxiety and stress around, it can be difficult for employees to stay focused and productive. Here are a few ways that employers can help their workers cope with a crisis:

-Encourage regular breaks and time outside of work to relax and de-stress.

-Create a supportive environment where employees feel comfortable openly discussing their concerns and struggles.

-Offer flexible work hours or arrangements to accommodate employees who are struggling to balance work with personal responsibilities.

-Provide resources and information on how to deal with anxiety, stress, and other mental health issues.

By taking these steps, employers can create a workplace that is more supportive and understanding during times of crisis.

In times like these, we all need a little extra support.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tags: Business Continuity, Entrepreneurship, Mental Health

Unlock New Potential in Decision-Making Process
Thinkers360
May 23, 2022

Regardless of whether you’re a cut-and-dried decisionmaker or an overthinker, a solid chunk of leaders have found navigating the post covid era of the constantly evolving Covid-19 pandemic to be a choose-your-own-adventure exercise with the fun sapped out. An October 2021 study conducted by the American Psychological Association revealed that more than a third of Americans said the pandemic had made both simple and major decisions more stressful. While there’s no one silver bullet answer when it comes to handling pandemic-related decisiveness, some experts suggest that being more mindful and present can help ease the mental load. “Part of what I think people are dealing with right now is this cognitive overload, making all these decisions on a day-to-day basis,” clinical psychologist Alicia H. Clark, PsyD, told Oprah Daily. “We are in survival mode and our prefrontal cortex — which is responsible for judgment, planning and complex problem solving — doesn’t work as well when we’re in survival mode.

If you've ever been stuck in a seemingly endless cycle of indecision, you're not alone. According to new research, complex decisions don't just boggle our brains; they exhaust them, too. The study's authors say that this "decision fatigue" can lead to suboptimal choices in everything from what we eat to how we vote.

So why do we have such trouble making tough decisions? The answer, it turns out, is both behavioral and physiological. On the behavioral side, leaders often underestimate the effort required to make a decision, says Kevin da Silva-Castanheira, a graduate student who studies the psychology of decision-making at McGill University. "There's a lot of evidence behaviorally that suggests that people don't like making [preference or risk-based] decisions," he explains. "So, for example, when a decision is really hard, people tend to do things like stick to the status quo, or not even choose at all."

But it's not just our psychology that gets in the way of rational thinking; it's our biology, too. When we're considering a complex decision, our brains use up a lot of energy (in the form of glucose). And just like any other muscle in our body, when our brain gets tired, it doesn’t want to work.

In my coaching of high-level leaders, I am finding them struggling to push themselves to move past what's possible and consider solutions that are currently impossible. Leaders are under immense pressure to make decisions that will have far-reaching consequences. They often feel like they are stuck between a rock and a hard place, and it can be very difficult to find a way out.

The pandemic has brought a lot of challenges for leaders all around the world. They have to make difficult decisions in a constantly changing environment. This is where VUCA comes in. VUCA is an acronym for Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity, and Ambiguity. It's a framework that can be used to describe the current state of the world. Leaders who are able to navigate through this VUCA world will be able to unlock new potential in their decision-making process.

Here are some tips on how to do this:

- Be adaptable: Things are constantly changing, so you need to be able to adapt quickly.

- Be aware of your own bias: We all have our own biases, so it's important to be aware of them and how they might impact your decisions.

- Be inclusive: When making decisions, try to include as many people as possible so that you can get different perspectives.

- Be clear and concise: In a VUCA world, things can get very confusing very quickly. So it's important to be clear and concise in your communication.

By understanding and preparing for these challenges, leaders can make decisions that are both agile and informed. In a post pandemic world, those who are able to navigate these challenges will be the ones who emerge victorious.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Entrepreneurship, Startups

Most Workers Are Not Knowledge Workers
Thinkers360
May 23, 2022

There is no doubt that knowledge workers have become a major focus in today's economy. They are the ones who can easily work at any time from any place, and their skills are in high demand. However, it is important to remember that most workers are not knowledge workers. In fact, the majority of workers are employed in sectors such as manufacturing, agriculture, and construction, where working conditions and pay are often poor. We must not forget about the majority of workers who do not have the same privileges as knowledge workers.

It seems like the leadership experts have forgotten about the leaders who lead those who are not knowledge workers. Often referred to as non-skilled workers, these employees typically don't have the same flexibility when it comes to where and when they can work. For many of them, commuting is a necessary part of the job, and they can't just pick up and work from home whenever they want. As a result, the discussion around remote work doesn't always apply to them. But that doesn't mean their needs should be ignored. Leaders of non-skilled workers still have to find ways to motivate and engage their employees, and the new expectations around remote work can make that challenge even greater.

The pandemic has hit the U.S. economy hard, but perhaps no group has been harder hit than non-skilled workers. These are the people who work in businesses that have been forced to close due to the pandemic, such as restaurants, bars, and clubs. They are also the people who work in industries that have been impacted by the change in consumer behavior, such as retail and travel. As a result of the pandemic, many non-skilled workers have lost their jobs or have had their hours reduced. This has led to an increase in poverty and inequality, as well as a decrease in consumer spending. In addition, the pandemic has also had a negative impact on mental health, as people struggle to cope with job loss and financial insecurity. It will take time for the economy to recover, and non-skilled workers will continue to feel the effects of the pandemic for some time to come.

The Covid-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on the way that factories operate. In many cases, managers have had to rapidly adapt their methods of leadership in order to keep workers safe and productive. One of the biggest challenges has been maintaining social distancing while ensuring that production lines are running smoothly. This has often meant making changes to the layout of the factory floor and setting up new protocols for breaks and shift changes. In some cases, it has also meant implementing new technology, such as contactless time clocks and temperature scanners. The pandemic has certainly been a challenge for factory managers, but it has also forced them to be more innovative and adaptable in their leadership style.

As we continue to discuss the best ways to move forward as a nation, it's important that we don't forget about the workers who impact us on a daily basis. These are the men and women who keep our streets clean, our hospitals running, our food stocked, and our schools teaching. They are the unsung heroes of our society, and they deserve to be heard. When we make decisions about the future of our country, we need to consider the needs of these workers and make sure that their voices are included in the conversation. Otherwise, we run the risk of making decisions that don't reflect the reality of their lives. We need to remember that they are the backbone of our country and that their needs should be at the forefront of our minds as we move forward.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tags: Startups, Future of Work, Business Continuity

Who's Laughing Now?
Thinkers360
May 21, 2022

It's hard to deny the truth of Charlie Chaplin's famous quote - a day without laughter really is a day wasted.

In a Gallup study, 1.4 million people across 166 countries were asked a simple question: Did you smile or laugh a lot yesterday? For those between 16 and 23 the answer is yes. After the age of 23, the answer becomes no. In fact, we do not start smiling again until the age of 70 or 80.

Why aren’t we laughing anymore? Our minds are racing, worrying about the past or the future, and as a result, we’re missing what’s happening right in front of us. We aren’t able to laugh because we aren’t fully engaged in the moment. This lack of presence is having a profound impact on our lives and our work. We’re less creative, less productive, and less happy. This is a serious issue that needs to be addressed. Leaders need to create an environment where people feel safe to take risks, fail, and learn from their mistakes. They need to encourage openness and transparency and create opportunities for collaboration. Only then will we be able to tap into our full potential and start laughing again.

Happiness and high energy levels are essential for both employees and employers, and there's no better way to boost morale and productivity than with some lighthearted play at work. Fun researcher, Bernard Louise De Koven, suggested that 'you can predict a successful business if you can hear heartfelt laughter 10 to 12 times per day'. According to a study by Nicholas A. Kuiper and Rod A. Martin, adults who laughed more had more social interactions.

According to Scott Christopher, author of "The Levity Effect: Why It Pays to Lighten Up", humor is a learnable skill that enriches workplace culture. Bringing humor to work does not mean figuring out how to be the best stand-up comedian in the office. Instead, using humor can simply be thought of as a way of sharing moments of lightness at work to propel relationships forward and balance the seriousness of everyday tasks. For example, levity is about putting others at ease, being friendly, warm and authentic. Humor does not have to be particularly good to trigger positive emotions - it just has to be present. In other words, incorporating humor into your work life can make a big impact on your overall satisfaction with your job. Not to mention, it can also lead to better teamwork, communication and collaboration. So next time you're feeling stressed at work, try cracking a joke or two - it might just make your day (and your career) a whole lot brighter.

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Tags: Startups, Entrepreneurship, Mental Health

Leadership in the Gig Economy
Thinkers360
May 18, 2022

Entrepreneurship has always been about more than just making money. It's about solving problems, pushing boundaries, and changing the world. However, in recent years, entrepreneurship has lost some of its luster. The rise of the gig economy has made it seem like anyone can be an entrepreneur, and the challenges of running a business have been downplayed. As a result, many people are surprised to find that entrepreneurship is actually quite lonely. When you're constantly hustling to make your vision a reality, it can be hard to find time for socializing. Moreover, not everyone will understand your passion for your work or why you're constantly striving to innovate.

The rise of the gig economy has given rise to a new breed of entrepreneur. No longer tied to a 9-to-5 job, these solo professionals are free to pursue their passions and make a living on their own terms.

According to a new report from Spera, a provider of tools and resources for freelancers and entrepreneurs, 25% of the U.S. is now officially part of the freelance gig economy. This growing community of solo professionals is made up of a diverse group of people, from stay-at-home parents to retired seniors. And they're not just working in traditional freelancing fields like writing or web design.

The freedom and flexibility of the gig economy has made it an attractive option for many people. But it's not without its challenges; most freelancers don't have access to traditional employee benefits like healthcare or retirement savings plans. And because they're not employed by a single company, they don't have the same job security as someone with a full-time job.

The gig economy is a critical part of the labor market, with nearly 54 million Americans participating in some form of independent work. That's more than 33% of the entire U.S. workforce and is an increase of 700,000 workers over the previous year. Some researchers project that half of the working U.S. population will move into the gig economy within the next five years. About 1 in 12 U.S. households — more than 10 million people — rely on independent work for more than half of their income.

As the gig economy continues to grow, leaders will need to adapt their management style to fit the needs of a more fragmented workforce. One of the biggest challenges will be creating a sense of unity among workers who may not all be employed by the same company. To do this, leaders will need to understand the needs of each individual worker and find ways to address them. Another challenge will be managing a workforce that is spread out across different locations. Leaders will need to find ways to communicate effectively with workers who are not all in the same place. Lastly, leaders will need to be adaptable and willing to change their management style as the gig economy evolves. By being prepared for these challenges, leaders can ensure that they are successful in the gig economy.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Business Strategy, Entrepreneurship

Is Entrepreneurship Getting Harder?
Thinkers360
May 17, 2022

The Kauffman Foundation recently asked the question, "Can entrepreneurship solve environmental and social issues?" The answer, it seems, is a resounding yes. After all, entrepreneurship is all about coming up with new and innovative solutions to problems. And what could be more pressing than the need to protect our environment and improve our society? There are already many entrepreneurs who are using their creativity and innovation to make a difference. Some are developing new technologies that can help reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. Others are creating sustainable businesses that can help generate jobs and economic opportunity in underserved communities. Still others are developing new social media platforms that can help raise awareness about important issues. And it's not just idealism that is driving this trend. More and more consumers are interested in supporting companies that share their values, and they are willing to pay a premium for products and services that are environmentally friendly and socially responsible. What's more, many cities and states are offering incentives for businesses to adopt sustainable practices.

Let’s say all this inspires you. Imagine you have a great idea. You've done your research, created a detailed business plan, and assembled a team of passionate and talented people. You're ready to launch your business and start making your mark on the world. But then you hit a snag: you can't access the financing you need to get your business off the ground. This is a common challenge for entrepreneurs, and it's only become more difficult in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. According to recent research, 72% of entrepreneurs with businesses under one year old say that accessing startup funds has been a challenge during the pandemic. This is nearly double the 39% of entrepreneurs with businesses older than five years who say the same. The pandemic has caused many investors to be more cautious with their money, making it harder for startups to get the funding they need to grow.

For entrepreneurs of all business ages, finding new customers was the most common challenge reported. Among those with a new business less than 1 year old, 4 in 5 reported this as a challenge (80%), compared to about 7 in 10 owners of businesses that were 5 years or older (70% among those whose business was between 5-10 years old. Even before the pandemic, attracting customers can be difficult for startups that lack the brand recognition and customer base of more established businesses. The coronavirus outbreak has made it even more challenging for many entrepreneurs, as people have cut back on spending and made changes to their daily routines that limit opportunities for marketing and customer outreach. In addition, some potential customers may be hesitant to patronize new businesses during an uncertain economic time.

Entrepreneurship can be a powerful force for good in the world. We have seen countless examples of entrepreneurs who have taken on challenges and come up with innovative solutions that have made a real difference in people's lives. In recent years, we have seen a surge in social entrepreneurship, with more and more people using their business acumen to tackle some of the world's most pressing problems.

With the outbreak of covid-19, we are once again seeing the importance of entrepreneurship in finding solutions to global challenges. Entrepreneurs are quickly adapting their businesses to the new reality, coming up with creative ways to keep their employees safe and their customers happy. In many cases, they are also developing new products and services that can help us all get through this difficult period.

So let's make sure we support our entrepreneurs as they continue to play a vital role in making the world a better place. They very well may have the solutions we all need for a better future.

 

 

 

 

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Tags: Business Continuity, Entrepreneurship, Startups

Foster Belonging & Leverage Uniqueness
Thinkers360
May 16, 2022

Prior to the pandemic, team collaboration gave companies a competitive advantage. Leaders spoke of the importance of fostering a collaborative environment where employees could come together to share ideas and solve problems. However, the pandemic has disrupted the concept of team, with many workers now working remotely. This has led some to question whether team collaboration is still relevant in today's business landscape. While there is no easy answer, it is clear that the pandemic has forced leaders to rethink what it means to be a team. In a remote world, team collaboration may look different than it did before, but it is still essential to driving innovation and creativity. As companies begin to bring workers back to the office, it will be important for leaders to create an environment where team collaboration can thrive.

The most effective leaders are those who can foster a sense of belonging among their team members while also leveraging the unique strengths of each individual. This can be a challenge, as it requires a leader to maintain a delicate balance between two competing goals. On one hand, it is important to create a cohesive team where everyone feels like they are part of something larger than themselves. This sense of belonging is essential for fostering motivation and collaboration. On the other hand, leadership also requires leveraging the unique strengths of each team member in order to create the strongest possible team. The best leaders are able to strike this balance, creating an inclusive environment while also maximizing the potential of each individual.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Entrepreneurship, Management

The Next Crisis for Business Continuity
Thinkers360
May 13, 2022

We all know that adapt and survive is the name of the game when it comes to business. But what happens when the thing you have to adapt to is a global pandemic? For many companies, the answer was: not much. Their business continuity plans failed them, leaving them scrambling to catch up.

The thing about business continuity plans is that they are notoriously under-tested. Almost every organization has a plan and almost nobody runs regular tests. This became abundantly clear during the rapid forced transition to company-wide work from home so many organizations experienced in mid-March.

For those companies who were able to adapt quickly, the key was in their flexibility. They had plans in place that could be executed quickly and efficiently, with little to no disruption. They also had the foresight to realize that the world was changing and that their plans needed to change with it.

Today leaders are grappling with the next big question: should remote workers come back to the office? Months have gone by, and the great resignation keeps rolling along. Some people thought that people would come flocking back to the office once invited back. Wrong. The fact is, corporate America is likely changed forever.

“You're making a huge mistake if you require folks back in office full time because they see progress most companies have made in the last two years, and they'll ask, 'why?'” - Amy Zimmerman, Chief People Officer, Relay Payments.

Leaders will need to be strategic about their decisions and understand that the way we work may have changed forever. The pandemic has forced employees to re-evaluate what is essential, and for many, working in an office five days a week is no longer a necessity. It's up to leaders to decide what's best for their teams, but they will need to keep in mind that the world of work has changed forever and there may be no going back.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Business Strategy, Health and Safety

A Mathematical Impossibility
Thinkers360
May 12, 2022

In former eras, dominated by farming or manufacturing, labor could certainly be physically punishing – but it obeyed certain limits. You can’t harvest the crops before they’re ready; you can’t make more physical products than the available material allows.

But in the era of what management consultant Peter Drucker called “knowledge work”, that’s changed. We live in an “infinite world”, says Tony Crabbe, author of the book Busy: How to Thrive in a World of Too Much. There are always more incoming emails, more meetings, more things to read, more ideas to follow up. And because modern work is often done remotely, Crabbe adds, there’s no clear boundary between when our working day starts and ends. As a result, many of us feel like we’re always on call – and that can be extremely draining.

We're always rushing around these days, trying to get everything done. It seems like there's never enough time in the day to get everything done. And digital mobile technology means we can easily crank through a few more to-do list items at home, or on holiday, or at the gym. The result, inevitably, is feeling overwhelmed: we're each finite human beings, with finite energy and abilities, attempting to get through an infinite amount. We feel a social pressure to "do it all", at work and at home, but that's not just really difficult; it's a mathematical impossibility. With that kind of time pressure weighing us down, it's hardly surprising that we live with one eye on the clock. We're always racing against the clock, trying to beat the clock, trying to make the most of every minute. But what if we stopped living like this? What if we took a step back and looked at our priorities? What if we made time for what's truly important? We might just find that we're happier and more productive when we're not always rushing around.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Entrepreneurship, Mental Health

You Can't Delegate Thinking
Thinkers360
May 11, 2022

Delegation is an important skill for any leader. The ability to delegate tasks effectively can mean the difference between a successful team and an unsuccessful one. However, many leaders only delegate tasks, and not authority. This can be a mistake, as it can lead to a situation where the leader is the only one who has the power to make decisions. Private equity firms often look for leaders who are competent at delegating both tasks and authority. This allows them to see how deep the delegation goes, and whether or not the leader is truly committed to empowering their team. When done correctly, delegation can be a powerful tool for any leader.

Leaders are often so busy putting out fires and dealing with pressing issues that they forget to take time for themselves to think. However, this is the one area of their job that they cannot delegate. In today's world of volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity, it's more important than ever for leaders to make thinking a priority. By taking some time each day to reflect on the situation and come up with creative solutions, leaders can stay ahead of the curve and avoid being reactive instead of proactive. Additionally, regular reflection can help leaders avoid making impulsive decisions that they may later regret. So next time you find yourself in the middle of a whirlwind, take a step back and give yourself some time to think.

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Tags: Business Continuity, Business Strategy, Management

Has Respect Been Canceled?
Thinkers360
May 10, 2022

Has respect been cancelled at work? Judging by recent events, it might seem like it. It seems as employers are demanding employees return to the office, employees are increasingly being treated like commodities, with little regard for their wellbeing. In addition, there seems to be a growing culture of disrespect, with people feeling free to say and do whatever they want, without repercussions. All of this is having a negative impact on morale and productivity. Research has linked workplace disrespect to a host of problems, including anxiety, depression, and chronic stress. So it's no wonder that we're all feeling a bit stressed out these days. If you're feeling disrespected at work, it's important to speak up for yourself.

The pandemic has been a tough time for everyone, and respecting each other has become more important than ever. We've had to respect each other's personal space, work schedules, and ways of dealing with stress. We've also had to be more understanding and patient with each other.

No matter what field you work in, respect is an important part of the workplace. Whether it's showing respect for your boss or coworker, or setting the tone for how you want to be treated, respect is a key ingredient in a successful workplace. But where did this concept of respect come from? Respect in the workplace has a long and storied history, dating back to the early days of the Industrial Revolution. At that time, workers were often treated like machines, and there was little regard for their safety or well-being. As the labor movement gained strength, however, workers began to demand better treatment and greater respect. Over time, these efforts led to major changes in the way businesses operate, and today, respect is an essential part of the workplace. By understanding its history, we can better appreciate its importance and continue to build workplaces that are safe, healthy, and productive.

So how will respect be invited back into the office? For one thing, companies will need to create an environment where respect is valued and encouraged. This means having policies and procedures in place that discourage disrespectful behavior and promoting a culture of mutual respect. It also means being more mindful of how we interact with our colleagues, both in person and online. And finally, it means setting the example ourselves by being respectful of others. If we want to see more respect in the workplace, we need to start by being respectful ourselves.

The thing about disrespect is that it's usually pretty easy to spot. Whether it's the way someone talks to a coworker or the attitude they bring into the office, disrespect can quickly sour the atmosphere of even the most positive work environment. And once you've noticed it, it can be hard to ignore.

 

 

 

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Tags: Leadership, Culture, Future of Work

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Location: Houston, Texas    Date Available: June 01st, 2022     Fees: Custom All-Inclusive Fee Structure

Submission Date: May 22nd, 2022     Service Type: Service Offered

Bridgepoint Coaching & Strategy Group is a strategic coaching firm specializing in coaching, training and leadership development. Our team of coaches are committed to working with organizations to improve their financial performance by unlocking full functionality of each person within an organization. We believe that people need to be reminded more often than they need to be instructed. We partner with companies for an immediate and lasting impact on financial performance and corporate culture by engaging from the front-line to senior executives. Our process is all about people, and most definitely about results.

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HOW TO BUILD THE PERFECT TEAM

Location: Houston, Texas    Date Available: June 01st, 2022     Fees: 7500

Submission Date: May 09th, 2022     Service Type: Service Offered

Much of the work done at Google, and in many organizations, is done collaboratively by teams. The team is the molecular unit where real production happens, where innovative ideas are conceived and tested, and where employees experience most of their work. But it’s also where interpersonal issues, ill-suited skill sets, and unclear group goals can hinder productivity and cause friction. Google researchers applied a similar method to discover the secrets of effective teams.Code-named Project Aristotle - a tribute to Aristotle’s quote,"the whole is greater than the sum of its parts" (as the Google researchers believed employees can do more working together than alone) - the goal was to answer the question:“What makes a team effective?".

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