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Clive Lloyd

Director/Principal Consultant at GYST Consulting

Brisbane, Australia

I assist leaders and organisations to create safe and mentally-healthy workplaces where care, engagement, psychological safety and well-being can thrive. I have worked extensively with senior leaders, supervisors and team members of many global organisations and applied my many years of experience as a psychologist to performance coaching. I am particularly focussed on organisational culture through the implementation of our acclaimed "Care Factor" program.

Available For: Authoring, Consulting, Influencing, Speaking
Travels From: Brisbane, Australia

Clive LloydPoints
Academic0
Author15
Influencer4
Speaker3
Entrepreneur0
Total22

Points based upon Thinkers360 patent-pending algorithm.

Thought Leader Profile

Portfolio Mix

Company Information

Company Type: Company
Business Unit: Consulting Psychologists
Theatre: Global
Media Experience: 15 years
Last Media Interview: 12/10/2018

Areas of Expertise

Culture 31.57
Health and Safety 40.67
HR
Leadership 30.78
Management 30.15
Social 31.22
Customer Experience 30.52

Industry Experience

Aerospace & Defense
Agriculture & Mining
Building Materials, Clay & Glass
Chemicals
Engineering & Construction
Federal & Public Sector
Financial Services & Banking
Healthcare
Higher Education & Research
Industrial Machinery & Components
Manufacturing
Media
Oil & Gas
Primary Metal & Steel
Professional Services
Utilities

Publications

15 Article/Blogs
People are not rats: Moving past Behaviour-Based Safety
Linkedin/Clive Lloyd
January 22, 2019
In defence of evidence-based approaches, it is time to move past outdated modalities

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Tags: Culture, Health and Safety, Leadership

How Cognitive Biases affect decision-making (and what we can do about it)
Clive Lloyd/Linkedin
November 05, 2018
We can tend to think our planning and decision-making activities are conscious acts, involving deep thinking and analysis. While this is true some of the time, a great deal of our thinking takes place at an unconscious level. Being aware of this tendency to operate on autopilot, as well as understanding what we can do about our brain’s tendency to switch to unconscious processing is essential to objective decision-making.

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Tags: Culture, Leadership, Social

Helping Your Team To Overcome Challenges Whilst Building a Culture of Responsibility and Accountability: The Stockdale Paradox
Clive Lloyd/Linkedin
September 04, 2018
A good deal of our coaching work with leaders is spent assisting them to effectively work through current issues (e.g., organisational change, increasing injury rates, declining morale etc.). Furthermore, we then coach these leaders so they (in turn) can assist their teams to overcome their own perceived challenges.

The process we most frequently utilise in such sessions is a relatively simple one, yet - when facilitated well - it is extremely powerful for identifying clear, solution-focussed pathways while simultaneously creating a culture of accountability and responsibility within our teams. This tool is the Stockdale Paradox.

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Tags: Culture, Leadership, Management

Is there such a thing as a dumb question? A Leader's guide to using questions effectively
Clive Lloyd/Linkedin
October 11, 2017
After 20+ years working as a psychologist, I am convinced that one of the most powerful influencing tools we have at our disposal is the effective use of questions, yet developing this skill set has not necessarily received the attention it deserves in leadership development programs.

While most leaders have been schooled about the vagaries of basic ‘open’ and ‘closed’ questions, there are far more powerful techniques that can be explored and mastered relatively quickly that can dramatically impact team culture and performance.

This article will provide some brief insights into how leaders can quickly develop their use of effective questions. It is far from exhaustive, and the interested reader is invited to get in touch with us to discuss how our question-specific Care Factor Program modules can rapidly build mastery in this area within your leadership team.

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Tags: Culture, Leadership, Social

How Mature is your Safety Culture? -Measuring and Operationalising the "Care Factor"? across Hudson's Safety Maturity Dimensions
Clive Lloyd/Linkedin
August 18, 2017
To provide a reliable, valid and research-based safety climate survey, GYST Consulting partnered with Blue Provident - a company highly regarded for their work in organisational culture assessment and development. The result is an outstanding survey tool organisations use to get a current fix on their safety maturity level.

Typically, the survey is conducted site-wide prior to a rollout of the Care Factor Program. The subsequent survey report outlines clear pathways for a client to pursue in order to progress to the next levels. These recommendations are addressed during the Care Factor Program rollout, and when the program is complete, a follow-up survey objectively tracks the company's progress.

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Tags: Culture, Health and Safety, Leadership

Who has more workplace incidents - internals or externals? (and what can we do about it?): The role of Locus of Control in Organisational Safety
Clive Lloyd/Linkedin
August 17, 2017
In 1985, Jones and Wuebker developed and validated a safety-specific locus of control scale. Subsequent research has consistently demonstrated that externally-oriented individuals exhibit higher accident rates (e.g., Hansen, 1988; Arthur, Barrett, & Alexander, 1991). Across a variety of occupations, Locus of Control has been found to predict the number of reported accidents, and accident severity (Wuebker, 1986).

Transport related incidents are frequent, and Roy and Choudhary (1985) found that "externals" were more likely to be involved in driving-related accidents. Moreover, Jones and Wuebker (1993) found that individuals with an external Locus of Control had average accident related medical costs over 2.6 times higher than their internally-oriented counterparts (cited in O’Connell and Reeder, 2017).

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Tags: Culture, Health and Safety, Leadership

Without Trust “Zero Harm” is just another platitude
Linkedin
July 24, 2017
Why trust is essential for creating an effective safety culture

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Tags: Culture, Health and Safety, Leadership

Building Facilitation and Engagement skills in your Leaders:
Clive Lloyd/Linkedin
July 03, 2017
Whether it is a manager seeking to create enthusiasm for significant organisational change, a trainer with a goal of educating the workforce, or a supervisor running a toolbox talk, sound engagement and facilitation skills are vital if a message is to heard, accepted and internalised.

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Tags: Culture, Health and Safety, Leadership

Having "Difficult Conversations": A Leader's Guide
Clive Lloyd/Linkedin
June 28, 2017
The catalyst for writing this article was a request to design and deliver a training program for managers who were to be making a number of their workforce redundant (prior to a move towards a more contractor-based workforce). This proved to be a very astute move by the client as there are a number of factors (not least legal and reputation-based) to consider when managers are tasked with these challenging conversations.

Managers are not always equipped with the skills required to deal effectively with the range of intense emotions that can be elicited in such meetings. However, a failure to conduct these sessions well and with genuine care can have a major impact on those leaving the company as well as those who remain in terms of trust levels, morale and discretionary effort.

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Tags: Culture, Leadership, Social

The Emperor has no clothes- beyond Behaviour Based Safety
LinkedIn
June 24, 2017
Moving beyond Behaviour Based Safety in favour of Authentic Leadership

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Tags: Culture, Health and Safety, Leadership

Are your Company Values working for you? Try this test!
Clive Lloyd/Linkedin
March 07, 2016
"Your core values and purpose, if properly conceived, remain fixed. Everything else—your practices, strategies, structures, systems, policies, and procedures—should be open for change. Values are a fixed stake in the ground. You get it right once, and the rest of the work consists of tinkering with the organization. Typically, executives devote a tiny percentage of their time and effort to gaining understanding, a tiny percentage to creating alignment, and the vast majority to documenting and writing a statement. In fact, the distribution of time and effort should be nearly the opposite. You should spend a significant percentage of time actually trying to gain understanding, a tiny percentage documenting that understanding, and the vast majority of your time creating alignment. In short, worry about what you do as an organization, not what you say.” - Jim Collins

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Tags: Culture, Leadership, Social

You can lead a horse to water, but is it thirsty? Creating motivation for the use of "Take 5s"
Clive Lloyd/Linkedin
March 28, 2015
If you are realistic and in touch with your teams you may also have realised that (in all likelihood) your peoples' view of such tools is not particularly favourable. Indeed, I would bet the majority of your people (depending on the prevailing safety culture) would see these tools as "a tick and flick exercise", "an arse-covering exercise by management", "a waste of time" or similar.

Accordingly, such beliefs tend to become self-fulfilling prophecies, and the Take 5s are completed unconsciously or (in some cases) in the crib room.

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Tags: Culture, Health and Safety, Leadership

Pre-Start Meetings: You snooze, you lose!
Clive Lloyd/Linkedin
October 10, 2014
If we are serious about running effective pre-start meetings – and we should be – then we need to provide our supervisors with at least a basic skill-set that enables them to generate engagement.

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Tags: Culture, Health and Safety, Leadership

What stops your people intervening?
Clive Lloyd/Linkedin
July 15, 2014
What do we need to do as leaders to encourage more of these potentially life-saving conversations?

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Tags: Culture, Health and Safety, Leadership

Take 5s: Moving Beyond 'Tick & Flick' - Three Ways to build workforce support for Personal Risk Assessments
Clive Lloyd/Linkedin
July 03, 2014
In some organisations the tools are used effectively, whereas others struggle to gain any genuine benefits – really demonstrates that the success or otherwise of a PRA has little to do with the tools themselves. What makes all the difference is how the workforce thinks and feels about the tool, and subsequently what they do with them!

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Tags: Culture, Health and Safety, Leadership

1 Media Interview
THE CASE FOR TRUST, FIRST. WITH CLIVE LLOYD
Andrew Barrett
November 27, 2018
Most of us intuitively know it’s importance. We use it in our language. Our sense of it guides how we interact with others, and how others interact with us. Today, you’ll hear the case for trust, and not how it merely exists along side other things, but how it needs to come first.Clive Lloyd joins me today. Clive grabbed my attention for a few reasons. First, he came highly recommended by people I trust. Beautifully ironic give the focus of our conversation. Second, he is generous in helping people like you and I learn and grow and succeed. And thirdly, the focus of his work is on a topic close to my heart, which I didn’t realise wasn’t just important in my own experience, but what the academic literature says is vital to effective change. Such is my curiosity that I did a little searching, and despite the fact that this is the first time we’ve talked about trust as a specific topic on the Safety on Tap podcast, there are no less than 10 other episodes which bring up trust.Let’s get reflecting. Here’s my three takeaways from that chat with Clive:
Takeaway #1: Sometimes, we need to drop the safety word to work on safety. There is an increasing body of research and opinion which suggests that safety culture ‘aint a thing, it’s just culture. Then on leadership, sure we talk about and describe and influence safety leadership, but as Clive suggests safety comes when just leadership improves. The challenge we face as professionals is that increasingly, we need to work less on stuff labelled, or obviously about health and safety. What would that look like for you? What are you already doing where you’ve dropped the safety word, and getting good results? How can you move yourself, your team, and your organisation to a better future where the words health and safety are less, but actual health and safety is more?
Takeaway #2: It doesn’t matter what you do, start with trust. The title of this episode says it all. Like I said at the beginning, I intuitively knew this, but it kind of hit me like a brick during this chat. Our challenge then is to work out how will we work on trust? It has the same challenge at the first takeaway, where it’s not labelled safety. That shouldn’t stop us. How does trust work with your own relationships? Your teams? Your entire function? How might you look for and influence trust, and it’s three core components, through your systems and strategy?
Takeaway #3: Be careful with care. Clive’s rationale is stunningly simple and clear, why he and his team focus so much on care, or benevolence. My only reflection on this is that the word care, often is abused in safety. We throw it around, usually describing a lack of it in an individual, team or company. That worker just needed to show more care. That leader just needs to care more. No one around here cares about safety. I encourage you to explore how you, as Clive does, can support an increase in the conveyance and perception of care. Just be careful how it might come across, given that word is so often abused.

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Tags: Leadership, Health and Safety, Culture

1 Speaking Engagement
GYST Consulting’s Clive Lloyd interviews Off Road Skills’ enduro legend Simon Pavey
Clive Lloyd
July 30, 2018
Simon talks about his current Australian expedition from Cairns to Broome, risk taking, complacency and whether Ewan McGregor and Charley Boornan can actually ride!

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Tags: Customer Experience, Health and Safety, Leadership

Blog

Opportunities

1 Business
Creating Psychologically Safe Workplaces

Location: Brisbane, Queensland    Date Available: January 01st, 2019    Fees: On Request

Submission Date: January 05th, 2019    Service Type: Service Offered

Statistically, in Australia alone, this week 3-4 people will die as a result of a workplace incident, and many more will be seriously injured. Moreover, as organisations are seeking to do more with less, increasing episodes of heightened workplace stress and mental health challenges can go unnoticed, often resulting in serious, even tragic outcomes. In Australia, every second day an employee in the construction industry alone commits suicide.



Beyond Behaviourism – The “Why"

For well over a decade, many organisations within the mining, oil & gas and construction sectors have sought to improve safety performance through Behaviour Based Safety (BBS) programs. Unfortunately, BBS programs are often perceived in a negative way – especially by the workforce. Such programs are (rightly or wrongly) viewed as focusing on “policing”, “tick and flick” exercises or “dobbing on your mate”. Little wonder that cynicism about BBS tools and processes among team members is often very high. While some positive gains have been made, the BBS approach does little to create genuine engagement and intrinsic motivation. While many organisations persist with BBS programs (along with the associated ongoing expense and inevitable disappointment), for all of the above reasons, BBS programs are simply not sustainable as a stand-alone solution.

The “What”

In contrast, the Care Factor Program draws from more recent research into Positive Psychology, as well as the organisations that are considered “best in class” regarding safe operations – High Reliability Organisations (HROs). Consistent findings from such research demonstrate that key attributes such as trust, care, engagement, resilience, positive challenge and Authentic Leadership are strongly associated with excellence in safety cultures and employee well-being, largely by creating a strong sense of Psychological Safety.

The Care Factor Program builds these very attributes within our clients’ leaders, employees, contractors and culture.

The “Who”

Our Care Factor Program presenters are all Safety Psychologists and/or HSE professionals with many years of industry experience, particularly in the mining, oil & gas, utilities and construction sectors, and are exceptional facilitators and coaches.

They are not only content specialists but are also highly attuned to working with the internal processes and specific needs of each group or team member. The outcomes of this level of expertise are evidenced through consistent positive feedback from participants and improved outcomes in terms of safe operations, increased employee well-being and positive cultural development.

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Clive Lloyd